Podcast / Audio

Special Edition: GIS, Digital Twin, and the Intelligent Reality of Utilities Today with Pat Hohl and Bill Meehan of Esri [an Energy Central Power Perspectives™ Podcast]

Posted to Energy Central in the Digital Utility Group
image credit: Energy Central
Energy Central  Podcasts's picture
Voices of The Community Energy Central

The ‘Energy Central Power Perspectives™ Podcast’ features conversations with thought leaders in the utility sector. Each two weeks we’ll connect with an Energy Central Power Industry Network...

  • Member since 2020
  • 56 items added with 94,353 views
  • Jul 20, 2021 10:45 am GMT
  • 1406 views

This latest episode of the Energy Central Power Perspectives Podcast brings back two of our audience favorites to discuss a topic that’s been rapidly evolving and penetrating the market since we last had them in the podcast booth. Pat Hohl and Bill Meehan join up tackle the state of GIS and Digital Twins in the utility sector today, highlighting the technological advancements that are truly changing the way that the power sector thinks about these intelligent solutions and what’s possible for the future of the grid, of customer relationships, of utility maintenance, and more. Because the world of GIS is moving so quickly, host Jason Price and producer Matt Chester were eager to welcome back these guests who are undoubtedly leading the charge and waving the flag for GIS across the energy sector.

A special thanks to Esri for supporting this edition of the Energy Central Power Perspectives Podcast.

 

Prefer to Read vs. Listening? Scroll Down to Read Transcript.

See also an exclusive bonus clip at the bottom of this post only available to members of Energy Central to hear!

 

Thanks to the sponsor of this episode of the Energy Central Power Perspectives Podcast: Esri

 

Key Links:

Pat Hohl’s Energy Central Profile: https://energycentral.com/member/profile/pat-hohl 

Two Things to Know About Digital Twins: https://energycentral.com/o/esri/two-things-know-about-digital-twins

Bill Meehan’s Energy Central Profile: https://energycentral.com/member/profile/bill-meehan

Common Information Model (CIM) CIMplified – Part 1 – The Basics: https://energycentral.com/o/esri/common-information-model-cim-cimplified-%E2%80%93-part-1-%E2%80%93-basics

Esri’s Energy Central Page: https://energycentral.com/o/esri

 

TRANSCRIPT

Jason Price:
Hello, and welcome to Energy Central's Power Perspectives podcast, the source for in-depth discussion with leaders in the energy and utility industry. My name is Jason Price of Westman Rowe, and I'm coming to you from New York City. Joining me as always is Energy Central's community manager and podcast producer, Matt Chester.
 

Jason Price:
Matt, in this week's episode, we're checking in on two returning guests. Celebrities, if you will, in the GIS space. Before we dig into today's topic, could you recap for our listeners, what we discuss with our guests in the previous episode?

Matt Chester:
Of course, Jason. We're so happy to welcome these two guests back. We had one of them on the show back in episode number 10, which took place in April 2020 with the episode entitled The Future of Circuits: GIS Transforming the Grid and COVID-19 Response. And the other guests joined us just two episodes after that in May of 2020, for the episode we called to unlock the modern utility, GIS is king. Both of these episodes were definitely popular with the Energy Central community who seemingly can't get enough of GIS. So that's why we have them back with us again today.

Jason Price:
Well, fantastic. So today's episode, we'll be discussing the cutting edge solutions in the world of GIS and digital twins and exploring the intersection of some of these solutions. And there are surely no guests better suited to walk us through this topic, which is why we have invited Bill Meehan and Pat Hohl back onto the Power Perspectives.

Jason Price:
Bill Meehan is the director of Electric Utility Solutions for ESRI and he drives their geographic technology use in the global electric and gas utilities. Bill has been with ESRI for over 15 years and is a prolific writer in the field as regular readers of energy central will certainly recognize his name. Bill formerly was the vice president of Electric Operations for a major east coast power company. And he's author of several books.

Jason Price:
We also welcome back Pat Hohl, ESRI's director of electric industry solutions. Pat oversees the planning and execution of ESRI's go-to-market strategies in the electric utility industry. He's a pioneer in the use of GIS for electric utilities and has over 35 years of progressive experience in engineering, technology, operations, and executive management. When he's not knee-deep in the latest GIS implementation, he can also be found regularly contributing to the Energy Central community.

Jason Price:
But before we formally bring them into the booth, we do want to recognize the important role of ESRI on this podcast on Energy Central and this upcoming episode. Headquartered in Redlands, California, ESRI is a leader in the field of geographic mapping technology and GIS. While they are also known to be an international supplier geographic information systems and geo database management applications. The world of GIS and associated technologies is moving quickly, and no doubt there are immense updates and exciting new possibilities that Pat and Bill can outline for us since last year when we last chatted. So let's dive into it. Pat and Bill, welcome once again to the Energy Central Power Perspectives podcast. So let's dive in. Pat and Bill, welcome once again to Energy Central Power Perspectives podcast.

Pat Hohl:
Thank you, it's wonderful to be here.

Bill Meehan:
Thanks Jason. Yeah, it's great to be here and we appreciate everything that Energy Central has done for us.

Jason Price:
Fantastic. So Pat and Bill, you're both utility people at heart, so I have to ask. How did you get into GIS? And let's start with Pat.

Pat Hohl:
I was a T&D engineer and the utility that I worked for was embarking on a rather ambitious effort to modernize their maps and records function, and they needed someone to run with it. Since I rarely turned down a chance to do something new, I agreed to manage this project, and we converted mountains of paper maps to GIS. We developed applications and we rolled those out to the users. And as I learned about GIS, it was very eye-opening for me. It became a very powerful way to understand what we do in obvious ways and colorful displays. And I realized that everything a utility does has a location. Think about that for a minute. Assets, vehicles, customers, even bad weather. While they're all different, location matters to all of this things. And after I saw how GIS captures information by its location, I literally jumped in with both feet. I learned, I presented at conferences, I even wrote a couple of books. And that project sparked my fascination that continues to this day.

Jason Price:
Fantastic. Bill, would you like to take it next?

Bill Meehan:
Yeah. Pat and I have very similar backgrounds, but before I actually worked for a power company, I worked for an engineering consulting firm that was building power plants. Big, big, old power plants. And this was really before digital technology took place. And I had this old boss and he was a chain-smoking, coffee drinking, swearing kind of guy, but he was really brilliant. And he said to me, "Hey Bill, do you know anything about computers?" And I was working just as a regular electrical engineer. And I said, "Well yeah, I really like to work with computers." He says, "We got to figure out how best to design power plants." And so he said, "We have a real problem that when we designed power plants, there's all kinds of power cables and control cables and instrumentation cables. And what we have to do is take these big drawings of the plant layout and all these cable trays and conduits, and we need to tell the contractors where to route the cables. Where to put them in the conduits and the cable trays." And everything was done manually. It took literally forever. So he said, "Can you figure out how to automate that?" And I took the challenge and I said, "Absolutely."

Bill Meehan:
So I had expertise in what I would call this ancient programming language called FORTRAN. I don't even remember what ... Probably pat knows would FORTRAN even stands for. Formula translation. Who knows? But anyway, I developed this optimization of cable routing. And so I did. And so we developed it and we got to use it, and many, many power plants back in the old days were designed using this routing algorithm. But the problem was that you still had to extract data from manual maps and records and drawings, and it was really tedious. And I thought, "Wouldn't it be great if we could just take the data from these drawings and maps and layouts, and automatically capture that data, instead of having to take it from the maps and transpose it into my program." So I thought, "Wouldn't that be a great thing?"

Bill Meehan:
And then later when I joined the power company, this guy came to me, a young engineer and he had kind of a similar problem, only in his case it was, "How do I manage all these cables in downtown sections of a big city?" So I said, "Aha, why don't we create a project to do just that? Automate the maps and then take the data from the maps directly instead of having to transpose that information." So what that developed into was we'll just call it now, GIS. It was called something crazy called AMFM. Automated mapping facility management. So this was really the early Genesis of GIS. And once I did that, I really got into the passion of using the technology.

Matt Chester:
Some people in the world of energy might consider GIS a dry topic, but it's clear from your enthusiasm, the stories you're telling, that you find it to be anything but that. So where does this passion for GIS come from?

Bill Meehan:
Dry? Are you kidding me? It's really fascinating. One of my passions in life is this notion of innovation and transformation. And when I speak and I write, I like to think of how many things in this world have really changed our behavior? Changed things dramatically. And of course you always think of the smartphones as really a change thing. And going from say DVDs and VHS and DVDs to streaming video, it really changes behavior. So I get passionate about using new technology and technology in general to make significant and dramatic changes in the way we think about things. And I think GIS is one of those. I like to call it a transformational technology.

Bill Meehan:
Again, in the old days when we first started to do GIS, people had this notion of, "Well, why don't we automate the making of maps?" In other words, it's really a pain in the neck to make physical maps with paper and pencil and ink and Mylar and all that kind of stuff. And some people just thought, "Well, wouldn't it be great just to automate the process of making maps?" And I'm like, no, no, no, that's really not it. That's really a transition. That doesn't really change the way people use the maps. Instead, using GIS in today's way can literally change the way people operate an electric system or a gas system or water system or a telco system, because it's kind of like when we use the iPhone. We now do things that we never would've done before. We never thought of using an iPhone as an encyclopedia, or as a camera, or as a music device. It was just a phone. Same thing with GIS. GIS isn't just about creating automated maps. It's about visualizing and analyzing things that we couldn't see before. It's like, "Holy smoke, look at what this thing is telling us." It's doing analytics in ways that we could never have done with old fashioned maps. And that's why I get so passionate about it, because it's really about transformation. Changing things, and always, it seems to me changing things for the better.

Pat Hohl:
I would agree that drawing maps with a computer is pretty commonly understood. But I would say to anyone that you think GIS is a been there done that dry topic, you are a little bit behind. One thing that I find makes ESRI very unique is that we pour a full one-third of revenue into research and development. And that research created some astounding new capabilities well beyond AMFM and automated mapping, which was cool in the day, but we've come so much further. Those new capabilities create very detailed models. As you said, they enable very sophisticated types of analytics, and new ways to use and share the intelligence that comes as a result of that analysis. And these days, utilities are looking for answers. My passion comes from these new methods. We have mobile apps, we have all these other ways to use the information, and in doing so, stack the benefits on top of each other to help modernize what we do and make both utility work and the grid just that much smarter.

Jason Price:
Pivot to the topic of digital twins. So can you give our listeners your thoughts about digital twin and what exactly GIS has to do with it? And Pat, why don't we start with you?

Pat Hohl:
Sure. Digital twins are not a new thing. They have been around for years. And in utilities, we have various virtual representations of the real world. We've been talking about GIS. We use CAD a lot. We have simulations, various design environments, and these are often very specialized to different disciplines. Underground conduit design and protection coordination use completely different inputs. Different models, if you will. And we use models that reflect all of things, like the environment and our physical assets. We can use them in 3D, we can add real-time feeds, and even some external factors like the weather. And so by organizing these around location, GIS, while in itself it is a form of a digital twin, it's also an ideal framework to bring those various models together, each with their own special purpose, where they can be quickly and visually correlated and more easily understood. And that brings better decision-making to many utility workflows. Digital twins, I think, are extremely functional for both content and for context.

Bill Meehan:
I agree whole heartedly with that. One of the things that has frustrated me over the years, working for an engineering company, a power company, and dealing with many power companies working for ESRI, is this concept of a silo. And everybody knows what silos is. In business it's when almost like one hand doesn't know what the other hand ... The left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing. And our world has been built on silos. We've gone from manual, and before the ages of computers people had to break tasks up into little pockets and silos so that they could do them reasonably. And then when we automated those tasks, we automated those silos. And we've actually, in some ways, built barriers to co collaborating and cooperating. And I think what digital twin, the concept of digital twin is to really break those silos down. Breaking them down.

Bill Meehan:
And technically a digital twin is a virtual representation really of three things. The physical world, the physical objects. You could have a digital twin of a car or something like that. But also about relationships. How one thing relates to another, and then one of a behavior. And so, in a way, I think what Pat was also referring to is the GIS can help to facilitate the busting of silos. I would say that if anything can break down silos, it's GIS. They can break those silos down completely. Because we can almost think of GIS as a portal into many, many other ... Portal into those silos. Because really the common thing of literally all of those silos is location. And what does GIS do? It deals with location. And so I would think that the digital twin, that GIS is really the foundation of what a digital twin can be.

Bill Meehan:
When they talk about digital twin, sometimes they use the plural digital twins, or the digital twin. Well, when you think of a big organization, you probably do have many little digital twins, but that affect can be like a silo, but the GIS, because it has this commonality of location, can in fact be almost a portal into that organization. So it, in effect, becomes kind of an encompassing digital twin. Does that make sense?

Jason Price:
It does Bill, and I want to stay with you. So let's take it a step further. All right. So Energy Central is basically serving the utility audience. So they're listening to you right now, and I want you to take it a little bit more out of the abstract with some practical examples. So give them a reason why they need to get on the train and value what digital twin and GIS has to offer. And then also give them some practical examples of basically how it's helping the utilities. If you can take it to the practical, that'd be great.

Bill Meehan:
Yeah. There are really four things that a utility management has to think about. First of all, you have to make money, you have to make customers happy, keep customers happy, and then you have to keep employees safe and motivated. And the fourth thing he used to like to say is you got to keep the utility out of trouble. That's what keeps utilities operating really well.

Bill Meehan:
And what the digital twin does is it, first of all, it really works on efficiency. So if you're going to make money, you've got to, you got to reduce costs, you've got to increase revenue. And how do you do that? Well, you reduce the number of steps. And when you have a bunch of silos and a bunch of people working across purposes. That's expensive. And Pat and I know that going into the field and specifically trying to putting in a transformer or a switch or a valve, and if you don't have the right information, you don't have the right data in front of you, you've got to make a special trip back to the office, and let's say the power is out and you're wasting time, customers are very unhappy. Or if you're trying to trim trees in areas that customers really don't want that. It's going to make people unhappy, so your customer happy. Or if you don't have the right data in the right location, then you have safety issues. You have real problems with safety and you have accidents, and that's bad for everybody. And of course, if you drive a truck and you don't have the right location, you drive a truck over a vegetated wetland, and then you're on the front page of the New York Times or the Boston Globe or the Washington Post.

Bill Meehan:
So therefore, the digital twin helps to remove the barriers to making money or to losing money or to making customers unhappy, and safety and staying out of trouble. So that's really it. And I'm thinking of three particular utilities have done super job of using this notion of GIS and digital twin. And one of them is in Dubai, actually. DEWA, which is the Dubai Electric and Water Authority. And they have really been so creative in modeling. Instead of thinking about maps, like fiscal maps, they model what their facilities. Ironically, you kind of think of the Middle East as really investing heavily in fossil fuels. But DEWA is using the digital twin to look at solar and look at how they can really improve the environment. And they do a lot with that.

Bill Meehan:
And then in Florida, you have Lakeland Electric that they took all of their paper maps and just literally threw them away and said, "We have got to improve our efficiency." And then you take a look at CoServ Electric in Texas. They took a whole new approach to their mapping, and they really focused on the people in the field. The workers who are in the substations, in and in the cities and streets and so forth, and put everything that they had on a mobile device. So everything they do is on a mobile device. They could communicate with customers and materials and the fields. So they've basically broken down those silos to be able to save money, to improve customer service, to keep employees safe, and literally to stay out of trouble.

Pat Hohl:
Well Bill, I just want to come back to the silos for a minute. I used to work with an engineer named Steve. And when I would ask him about silos, he would get a halfway grant and he would say, "Yes, but there silos of excellence." And he was being funny when he said that, but he was really revealing a couple of things there. Number one, there is a lot of excellent information in there. And two, they are really silos.

Pat Hohl:
And so I would say to add on what you said, in short, a digital twin helps utilities pull that information from its silos, use it together and make it available to people that need it. And this idea, it supports improvements all across the organization, as you mentioned. For example, engineering has detailed structural designs for every substation. There's the land, there's the fences, the walls, air conditioning, equipment, security cameras, everything. However, that's normally locked away in some CAD drawing that only a few employees can use. So imagine using those drawings in a virtual 3D environment. To add value to things like training, to job planning, to safety awareness, and even answering customers' calls about that facility.

Pat Hohl:
But it doesn't stop there. Because you can add in real time status and almost any data and do analysis within a digital twin, this becomes a perfect framework to integrate all kinds of information, the digital twins, the plural twins of the modern world, and present them in convenient apps on any device to make them usable and improve our effectiveness. Even make predictions about what is likely to happen in the future.

Jason Price:
Big question here. Is there anything you guys don't agree on?

Pat Hohl:
Well, we have very similar backgrounds and experiences. I think Bill is probably more engaged in the pure engineering side, and I have a stronger connection to the field, and we usually agree on the details, but sometimes our emphasis is different. Bill loves music, and I think I know what your answer would be. Bill. What would favorite rock and roll band of the 70s be?

Bill Meehan:
Well, there's only one answer. And Pat, if you disagree with me ... Hey, I don't know. It's got to be The Eagles. Come on. The harmonies, the music, it's The Eagles. No choice. Absolutely.

Pat Hohl:
The Eagles are great. I remember the first time I heard Hotel California, I thought to myself, "Wow, I didn't know music could be like this." But if you're going to pin me down, I'm going to disagree with you.

Bill Meehan:
Oh, come on.

Pat Hohl:
And I'm going to go with Pink Floyd. For similar reasons.

Bill Meehan:
Well, both really, really great, great bands and continue. The music continues. People listen to it today.

Jason Price:
Absolutely. Can't argue with that. All right. Well, you guys have already kicked off the lightning round, which is where we get to learn a little bit more about you. So thank you for starting us off. The lightning round is basically an opportunity for each of you to give one short answer, or a brief explanation of what the response is. We're going to ask you a series of questions. Why don't we put some structure to it? How about Pat, you start, and then Bill, you follow, and then we'll go on to each of the questions that follow. So you guys ready to get started?

Pat Hohl:
Ready.

Bill Meehan:
You got it.

Jason Price:
Okay. Best gift you've ever gotten.

Pat Hohl:
The best gift I've ever gotten. When I was a young person, my mother gave me ... She wanted to buy me a really awesome set of hiking boots. And I had those boots for a very, very long time. They took me on adventures all over the country, I would have to say. That's right up there.

Bill Meehan:
Well, for me, this is easy. My wife for Christmas gave me ... And actually gave herself part of it. Two tickets to The Eagles concert in Las Vegas.

Jason Price:
All right. So Pat, what's your comfort food?

Pat Hohl:
Comfort food. Well, I could really go a lot of different directions with that, but I'm going to go with the comfort food that I reached for today, and that was peanut butter pretzels.

Bill Meehan:
Well, this is not good for me, but my favorite comfort food is mac and cheese. Or actually no. Baked macaroni, which is different from mac and cheese. It's, it's the real mac and cheese my mother used to make.

Jason Price:
All right. How about this one? What's something that both of you don't know about each other?

Pat Hohl:
Ooh, that's a good one. Bill and I have talked about a lot of things over the years, but I don't think Bill that you know that I am a certified advanced scuba diver.

Bill Meehan:
No. Let's see. What pat doesn't know about me is that in a high school, I was a long distance runner on the track team. Every single race, I came in last.

Pat Hohl:
I didn't know that.

Bill Meehan:
Probably because of the mac and cheese that I ate, that my mother used to make.

Jason Price:
This one's a tough one. What would be your dream job if it were not for working at ESRI?

Pat Hohl:
That's not really that tough. I've actually been thinking about this. I almost got into aviation as a young person, and my dream job would be helicopter pilot.

Bill Meehan:
Well, my dream job would be ... And I might do this is, is a fiction writer. I do love to write fiction. So it's somewhat related, but this would be what I would do.

Jason Price:
And let's stay with you, Bill. What are you most optimistic about?

Bill Meehan:
Oh, I'm optimistic about how the world will solve it's climate change issues. I think we're going to find the use of technology and some of it would be GIS actually, the technology and the wherewithal to turn this around.

Jason Price:
Pat?

Pat Hohl:
Similar in concept to Bill's, but I'm just generally excited about young people and the fresh perspective that they bring to our society, that they bring to utilities, and around this whole notion of customer service.

Jason Price
Well, fantastic. And I know that our audience is going to appreciate these responses, and it's great to learn a little bit more about each of you. Because you did so well, we'll give you the floor for the last question. And this goes to both of you. Where do you see GIS heading in the coming years from a digital twin perspective?

Pat Hohl:
Well, we're seeing a large push for infrastructure improvement. And I believe that we'll see integrated digital twins become the norm, and quite frankly, just become expected. Think for a minute about shopping. All the packages on doorsteps in my neighborhood tell the story. It's so different than really just a few years ago, and now it's expected and it's normal. And so many things in our society are changing in that way. They're changing the way that we function. Information is being put to use, and it makes many, many tasks easier and more efficient. Those packages, I usually know when they're going to arrive and I get a notification when they do. And the use of data is being used to refine almost everything. Yet many utility processes, they're still being done in very much the same way that they were when I started with utilities in the 80s. And that is changing. Utilities want in on the action, and if you look at their strategic goals, you'll see a reflection of that desire. Old information silos, they won't get us there. We do need ways to bring different kinds of data together, understand it and get it immediately in the hands of people that can use it.

Pat Hohl:
That capability helps everyone, but none more than those that are entering the workforce now. If you think about digital natives, they grew up with technology. They played on an iPad when they were young, and they expect things to work this way. So their training, their planning, their execution of their work, it can now all be done with the aid of 3D visualization, or as Bill said, 4D, including time, real time data and instant collaboration. And that's why I'm optimistic about those entering the workforce. I think they're going to help propel us to embrace better ways of working.

Bill Meehan:
Well stated, Pat. I'm going to go back to one of my favorite expressions, which is transformation. And when I think of the digital twin, I think it offers the really opportunity to see things in a different way. And I love to use the example of the old fashioned typewriter. Remember the typewriter and you'd look, and remember the levers? And you asked the question, well, why did they put the A in that silly spot way the heck over on the left-hand be struck by the weakest finger?

Bill Meehan:
Now, why would they do that? That's crazy? Why would they invent something silly like that? Well, because they were trying to slow typers down because the levers all jammed up. And so when we look at the keyboard, we say, "Well that's the way it has to be." It's not that they're willing to change, it's just that we were so used to things. We've become so used to certain things, we've become so used to the silos that we don't think of things in a different way. GIS helps us to see things, because it's not just about maps, it's about visualization and analytics to see things that we really didn't notice before. It's almost like I think of transformation. Somebody said, "Aha." Steve Jobs said, "Aha, why don't we do this?" And I think GIS is going to help the millennials, it's going to help even the older people to really innovate, because we're going to see things that we could never see before.

Bill Meehan:
We used to have this commercial called See What Others can't, and it's like opening up our eyes, peeling away the blinders to really change. And I think GIS, and it's got two components at least of the transformation. It's about technology for sure, and about behavior. And I believe GIS can be configured to change behavior for the better. And then when you think of the digital twin, because we're collapsing these silos ... Think about all these silos falling over, and GIS is helping us to do that so we can figure the technology to change behavior. It's not enough just to have the technology, but we have to configure it to change behavior for the better. And that's, I think, the future of GIS.

Jason Price:
Solid words. Absolutely. So Bill, Pat, it's been terrific to have you both on the podcast for a second go around. You guys make a great tag team, and we're thrilled to have you on the show, and hopefully we can do this again say another year from now or even sooner.

Bill Meehan:
Well, thanks a lot for this opportunity. We want to thank Energy Central, and certainly thank ESRI for allowing us to do this, and allowing us to really do what we're really passionate about. And I think that's a true gift is when you're working in something you really believe in. So thanks again.

Pat Hohl:
Absolutely. Sure thing. It's been fun, and we always enjoy working with the Energy Central team.

Jason Price:
Beautiful. You can always reach Pay Hohl and Bill Meehan through the Energy Central platform where they welcome your questions and comments. And on behalf of the entire Energy Central team, thanks to everyone for listening today. Once again, I'm Jason Price. The most relevant conversations of the utility industry today are happening in the Energy Central community. So we look forward to you joining us and sharing your insight at energycentral.com. And we'll see you next time on Energy Central's Power Perspectives podcast.


About Energy Central Podcasts

As a reminder, the Energy Central Power Perspectives™ Podcast is always looking for the authors of the most insightful articles and the members with most impactful voices within the Energy Central community to invite them to discuss further so we can dive even deeper into these compelling topics. Posting about twice per month, we'll seek to connect with professionals in the utility industry who are engaging in creative or innovative work that will be of interest to their colleagues and peers across the Energy Central community. Some podcasts may be a continuation of thought-provoking posts or discussions started in the community or with an industry leader that is interested in sharing their expertise and doing a deeper dive into hot topics or issues relevant to the industry.

The Energy Central Power Perspectives™ Podcast is hosted by Jason PriceCommunity Ambassador of Energy Central. Jason is a Business Development Executive at West Monroe, working in the East Coast Energy and Utilities Group. Jason is joined in the podcast booth by the producer of the podcast, Matt Chester, who is also the Community Manager of Energy Central and energy analyst/independent consultant in energy policy, markets, and technology.  

If you want to be a guest on a future episode of the Energy Central Power Perspectives™ Podcast, let us know! We’ll be pulling guests from our community members who submit engaging content that gets our community talking, and perhaps that next guest will be you! Likewise, if you see an article submitted by a fellow Energy Central community member that you’d like to see broken down in more detail in a conversation, feel free to send us a note to nominate them.  For more information, contact us at community@energycentral.com. Podcast interviews are free for Expert Members and professionals who work for a utility.  We have package offers available for solution providers and vendors. 

Happy listening, and stay tuned for our next episode! Like what you hear, have a suggestion for future episodes, or a question for our guest? Leave a note in the comments below.

All new episodes of the Energy Central Power Perspectives™ Podcast will be posted to the relevant Energy Central community group, but you can also subscribe to the podcast at all the major podcast outlets, including:


Thanks once again to the sponsor of this episode of the Energy Central Power Perspectives Podcast: Esri

 

See Below for an Exclusive Bonus Clip: Available only on EnergyCentral.com for our Community Members

Discussions
Spell checking: Press the CTRL or COMMAND key then click on the underlined misspelled word.
Ann Marie O'Connell's picture
Ann Marie O'Connell on Jul 23, 2021

Digital twinning does indeed demand that you break down silos, but it can also be an exhausting and expensive process to break through the silos, define the models, and retrain your workforce in using them effectively.

Bill Meehan's picture
Bill Meehan on Jul 29, 2021

You are absolutely correct!!  Silos were built for a reason - to help organize work into manageable tasks. That was the good news. The bad news was that they created obstacles to collaboration. To make matters worse as technology automated those tasks, the silos were fortified. The exhausting aspect of breaking down the silos and erecting digital twins is changing behavior. It requires the will of all parties to give up control - that's tough and threatening.  Thanks Anne Marie for your thoughtful comment.

Get Published - Build a Following

The Energy Central Power Industry Network is based on one core idea - power industry professionals helping each other and advancing the industry by sharing and learning from each other.

If you have an experience or insight to share or have learned something from a conference or seminar, your peers and colleagues on Energy Central want to hear about it. It's also easy to share a link to an article you've liked or an industry resource that you think would be helpful.

                 Learn more about posting on Energy Central »