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Episode #64. ‘Revisiting the Hottest Episodes of 2021 in Our 2nd Annual Podcast Year in Review' [an Energy Central Power Perspectives™ Podcast]

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The ‘Energy Central Power Perspectives™ Podcast’ features conversations with thought leaders in the utility sector. Each two weeks we’ll connect with an Energy Central Power Industry Network...

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  • Dec 21, 2021
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While 2021 might have been somewhat of a return to normalcy after 2020, the power and energy sector continued to see a rapid pace of news, developments, and trends. As the Energy Central Power Perspectives Podcast brought in guest week-in and week-out, we found that these episodes served as a great time capsule of such an eventful year for the utility industry. As such, we thought it only appropriate to continue the tradition started last year of featuring discussion and clips from the episodes during the previous 12 months that we enjoyed the most, that the audience engaged with most frequently, and that continued to shape our thinking through 2021 and into the new year.

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Listen in as podcast host Jason Price and producer Matt Chester are joined by Energy Central’s VP Audra Drazga to highlight some of the best guests and moments that took place on the podcast during our second full year in your podcast queue. And if we missed your favorite guests or key insights you can’t let go of, hop  onto EnergyCentral.com to let us know!

From all of us at the Energy Central Team and who work on the Power Perspectives Podcast, a sincere thanks goes to our listeners for an overwhelmingly successful 2021—we surely couldn’t do it without you!

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Thanks to the sponsors of this episode of the Energy Central Power Perspectives Podcast: West MonroeEsriAnterix, and ScottMadden

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TRANSCRIPT

Jason Price: 

Hello, and welcome to the Energy Central Power Perspectives Podcast. This is the show where we go straight to the energy industry sources to cover challenging topics, impacting the utility industry. I'm your host, Jason Price of West Monroe, and I'm coming to you from New York City. Joining me as always based in Orlando, Florida, his energy essentials, community manager and podcast producer, Matt Chester. Matt 2021 is coming to a close. And what a year it's been for all of us at Energy Central and in the energy and utility industry, don't you think?

Matt Chester: 
I Couldn't agree more Jason, it's been a truly exciting 12 months for the industry as a whole, and it's definitely been a whirlwind for us at the Energy Central Power Perspectives Podcast. So, I'm thrilled to be here to celebrate the end of the year with you.

Jason Price: 
Absolutely, and me too. And it's such a notable occasion as we wrap our second full year that we had to bring in a special guest. We've invited the VP of Energy Central, who will share her insight on the past year for our listeners, new and old.
So Matt let's bring her into the podcast booth all the way from Colorado, Audra Drazga welcome to the Energy Central's Power Perspectives Podcast.

Audra Drazga: 
Thanks, Jason. I'm excited to join in and be part of this special year end episode.

Jason Price: 
Well, as we sat down to think about the success of the podcast in the past year, we saw that the episodes we featured well reflected some of the major events in the utility industry during 2021. Matt, why don't we run through that list that we generated?

Matt Chester: 
Absolutely. Well, January started with new leadership at a number of IOUs, and we'll get to hear from one of them on today's podcast recap.

Jason Price: 
That's right then February was defined by the winter storm that hit Texas and almost brought the state to the brink of an energy meltdown.

Matt Chester: 
Absolutely. And then March, we saw some of the early work from the Biden administration in energy, notably the authorization of some massive offshore wind projects.

Jason Price: 
In April the COVID 19 vaccine rolled out, led to many industries returning to normal, which impacted power demand profiles, and oil consumption.

Matt Chester: 
In May, we saw the cybersecurity of the whole energy ecosystem come clearly into focus as the Colonial Pipeline was hit with a ransomware attack.

Jason Price: 
And in June, the data started to come in that showed renewable energy generation continued to surge.

Matt Chester: 
That's right, but then heat waves in July definitely strained the grid and pushed energy prices ever higher.

Jason Price: 
In August, you may recall, we witnessed horrifying flooding in Germany. Those horrific landslides wiped out entire towns followed in September by hurricanes Henry and Ida, wreaking havoc and the Caribbean all the way up to the Northeast.

Matt Chester: 
Right. And then during September, we saw some ramping up concern about fuel shortages, colder than expected winters to come and all of that bringing about oil and gas price spikes.

Jason Price: 
Right. And in October we hit a milestone. Tesla reached $1 trillion valuation, 11 years after its birth, a remarkable climb and historic symbol to the electric vehicle business.

Matt Chester: 
No doubt. And then in November we saw the passage of the infrastructure bill, a once in a generation piece of legislation that will directly impact our generation, transmission and distribution systems.

Jason Price: 
Yeah. And well, we're recording this podcast in the first half of December, so we'll have to wait to see what the dominant story of the month will be. Although most of the ones we just mentioned are still coming into play as the year comes to a close.

Jason Price: 
And that's just the list we came up with. For anyone listening who thinks we skipped over any of the most important stories, be sure to drop us a line and we'll put your additions in the transcript of this podcast, along with your name next to it, if you like.

Jason Price: 
So, all that's to say that yes, 2021 was a remarkable year with lots happening and no slowdown in sight. As a tradition here at Power Perspectives, we take time to reflect on the wisdom of our past guests that we hosted throughout the year. They took time out of their day to share experiences and pass on knowledge, and we would like to highlight some of the more memorable ones from this past year to remember them and repeat them in case you missed them the first time. So as we dive in Audra, let's hand the mic to you to tee it off. What did you think about the past year? What were some of the most memorable discussions you heard on Power Perspectives?

Audra Drazga: 
Thanks again, Jason. First, I want to thank both you and Matt for producing some incredible episodes over this past year. I also want to thank all of our guests for sharing their knowledge and expertise with the community. When we first launched our podcast series in late 2019, I was unsure if our industry would tune in. So I'm thrilled to report that our community and the industry have embraced our podcast series. And over the last two years, we have seen our listeners grow significantly. And I may be biased, but I believe our podcast is one of the most popular and trending series in the industry today. I'm excited to build upon our success and hope to take our podcast to another level in 2022. But before we tackle 2022, I'm thrilled to discuss highlights from a few of our more popular episodes over this past year. So let's get started.

Audra Drazga: 
In May we had the honor of interviewing Doug Houseman, one of the first registered users of Energy Central to join and participate in our newly launched community platform formed in 2017. Since then, he has contributed his time as an expert member and contributor in the community, participating in discussions, Q&A, and sharing his insights through posts and thought leadership articles. I have personally had the opportunity to have many conversations with Doug and appreciate all his support in the community. He is very passionate about the industry and willing to share his knowledge and expertise.

Audra Drazga: 
In episode number 41, Nothing But The Whole Grid, Doug further shares his knowledge specifically expanding on his article he shared with the community. In the episode, Doug discusses the issues we face today and shares how he would tackle the future. My favorite soundbite from this episode is his response to Jason's question. So let's say a utility CEO is listening today and agrees with everything you're saying. What would you tell the CEO as the first step to take in terms of moving forward with what we're talking about in your paper? Here's what Doug had to say.

Doug Houseman: 
Probably the first step I would take as a CEO is to take a step back and ask two questions. If I were to have my great grandchildren come into this company in a hundred years, what would it be famous for? Take all of the temporal issues out, take all of the personality issues out, take everything else out, and look well into the future and say, what do we actually need to do well, a hundred years from now? The second ask is, do I believe that we are actually going to get to electrification in 10 years, 20 years, 50 years? I don't care what the time period is. And what does that mean to my company in terms of load, reliability, resiliency, sources, storage, etcetera, again, without putting any temporal ideas behind it. And then use that as an end state to think about what steps they need to take today to get to that end state.

Audra Drazga: 
In July, we also interviewed two of my favorite community members and expert contributors from Esri, Bill Meehan and Pat Hohl. Over the last few years, I've had the privilege to work closely with Bill and Pat and have thoroughly enjoyed working with them and learning more about GIS and Esri. Between these two they have eons of expertise working in the industry, just kidding, Pat and Bill, so maybe it's years of experience. But no doubt they have a wealth of knowledge to share. In fact, just recently I had the privilege to work with them, to develop a video series called Utility Lessons Learned with Bill and Pat. In this monthly series, Bill and Pat share in little bite size snippets, fun stories of their lessons learned working in the industry. They have so many incredible stories to share, and I hope you will take a minute to watch a few of them, they are only five to six minutes long and can be found under the Esri company page on the sponsors tab of Energy Central.

Audra Drazga: 
For today, though I'd like to specifically focus on an excerpt from our podcast episode 47 GIS Digital Twin, and the Intelligent Reality of Utilities. In this episode, Jason asked Bill and Pat, where do you see GIS heading in the coming years from a digital twin perspective? And as always in typical storytelling fashion, here are Bill and Pat's responses.

Pat Hohl: 
Well, we're seeing a large push for infrastructure improvement, and I believe that we'll see integrated digital twins become the norm, and quite frankly, just become expected. Think for a minute about shopping all the packages on doorsteps in my neighborhood, tell this story, it's so different than really just a few years ago know, and now it's expected and it's normal. And so many things in our society are changing in that way, they're changing the way that we function. Information is being put to use, and it makes many tasks easier and more efficient. Those packages I usually know when they're going to arrive and I get a notification when they do. And The use of data is being used to refine almost everything, yet many utility processes they're still being done in very much the same way that they were when I started with utilities in the eighties.

Pat Hohl: 
And that is changing. Utilities went in on the action. And if you look at their strategic goals, you'll see a reflection of that desire. Old information silos they won't get us there. We do need ways to bring different kinds of data together, understand it and get it immediately in the hands of people that can use it. That capability helps everyone, but none more than those that are entering the workforce now. If you think about digital natives, they grew up with technology, they played on an iPad when they were young and they expect things to work this way. And so they're training, they're planning their execution of their work. It can now all be done with the aid of 3D visualization, or Bill said 4D, including real time data and instant collaboration. And that's why I'm optimistic about those entering the workforce, I think they're going to help propel us to embrace better ways of working.

Bill Meehan: 
Well stated, Pat. I'm going to go back to one of my favorite expression, which is transformation. And when I think of the digital twin, I think it offers the really opportunity to see things in a different way. And you know what, I love to use the example of the old fashioned typewriter. Remember the typewriter, and remember the levers? And you ask the question, well, why did they put A in that silly spot? Why the heck over on the left hand, be struck by the weakest finger, why did they do that? That's crazy. Why would they invent something silly like that? Well, because they were trying to slow typers down because levers all jammed up. And so when we look at the keyboard, we say, well, that's the way it has to be, that just is, it's not that we want to change, it's just that we're so used to things. We've become so used to certain things, we've become so used to the silos that we don't think of things in a different way.

Bill Meehan: 
GIS helps us to see things because it's not just about maps, it's about visualization and analytics to see things that we could probably didn't notice before. It's almost like I think of transformation. Somebody said, uh-huh (affirmative), Steve jobs said, uh-huh (affirmative), why don't we do this? And I think GIS is going to help the millennials, it's going to help even the older people to really innovate because we're going to see things that we could never see before.

Audra Drazga: 
Lastly, one of our goals with the podcast has been to include interviews with senior executives and leaders from utilities and or government agencies, and in May Jason and Matt brought on Mark Gabriel, formal CEO of WAPA, and now president and CEO of United Power as part of our leadership series. In episode number 39, Mark Gabriel talked about taking the grid of tomorrow from concept to reality.

Audra Drazga: 
This podcast episode couldn't have been time and layer and more relevant, as during this time the infrastructure bill was being pushed through Congress. Texas had just faced one of the worst power outages in the past decade, Californians were facing anticipated rolling blackouts along with another wave of anticipated wildfires. And we were in the middle of the hurricane season. The grid of course, was at the center of all these issues. My favorite talking point on this episode came from the question. The state of the grid has become a topic of quite heated interest recently, and that was even the case before the fiasco in Texas that led so many without power. Many people are calling the grid neglected, rundown, and there's a need to re-engineer completely. Would you contend that this is unfair unjustified and why is that? Mark's response was as follows?

Mark Gabriel: 
Well, if you look over the past 100 years, we've continuously upgraded and expanded the transmission system in the United States. In fact, WAPA alone spends roughly $160 million a year on upgrading its system, and that ranges on everything from more sensors and communication devices, to some really simple things like replacing wood poles with metal poles. So, I think it's unfair to suggest that the grid is somehow falling down or third world.

Mark Gabriel: 
Now, certainly there are technologies that can be added to the grid and should be added to grid. Certainly there are places where the transmission system needs to be bolstered, certainly more investment in terms of resilience and reliability are going to be critical for us to manage in a low carbon or no carbon environment going forward. But I do bristle a little bit when folks say, "oh, the grid is falling down." It really isn't. It can use more investment, but also we always have to balance the challenge of affordability, we could gold plate the grid and then turn around and find ourselves not being able to afford those upgrades. That said, there's things we could do right now that would significantly improve how the grid operates. And those things are investments that some of them are very simple, some of them are more complex, but I think it's unfair to say that the grid is somehow falling down or third world.

Jason Price: 
That was great Audra, I can see why those rose to the top. Matt, I'll turn it over to you to see if you have any highlights you'd like to share with us.

Matt Chester: 
You know, I do Jason, I think Audra highlighted some really key guests, but for me, what stuck out the most was some of the in depth insights, our expert guests brought. And I continue to think about many of those lessons learned that they shared with us to this day. So, to start, I'd like to highlight episode 51 with Charlie Botsford, where we discussed electric vehicles as a grid asset. Specifically as an expert in this field, Jason, you asked Charlie what he would do if he could direct government funding, such as COVID relief monies or stimulus funds to be the most effective at deploying and leveraging the electrical vehicle space. Charlie, we had this to say.

Charlie Botsford: 
So, the first category provides the greatest opportunity to supply grid services, as it turns out, for instance, overnight charging for school buses and even during the day. So school buses, I don't know if you know, but they go out in the morning and they go out in the afternoon, but in the middle of the day, there's plenty of opportunity for them to do V2G services.

Charlie Botsford: 
The second category enables true equivalency with conventional internal combustion vehicles. That's the old thing about, go out and you want to drive across the country, could you do it? Well, you actually can nowadays, maybe it was a little bit sketchy 20 years ago, but the more and more DC fast charging that gets out there like Tesla's 20,000 port super-charger network just in the US alone is amazing, and EV Electrify America and EV Go, and some of the other networks. All of that with DC fast charging really puts electric vehicles on the same footing as gasoline powered vehicles. So, I think those two scenarios are where the Administration really needs to put their money, our money actually, my money.

Matt Chester: 
I think that clip just spoke to me and is something I kept in mind while watching Congress debate the best use of funds in the infrastructure bill. And actually those federal policy debates have also brought about another topic of note, those in support of nuclear energy. While watching these discussions play out, I've regularly referred back to when we hosted Rudy Shankar on episode 50, the increasing role of nuclear energy to meet climate challenges. On the topic. Rudy had the following insights to share.

Jason Price: 
Given your position, you must be tracking what's going on in DC and even state governments around energy policy. What's the conversation regarding nuclear, especially as a climate fighting tool. Can you talk about that?

Rudy Shankar: 
Yes. In fact, I was very heartened to see that the Biden administration has a very ambitious clean energy plan, on which nuclear plays a dominant role. They're acknowledging that nuclear reactors have been very reliable sources of electricity. And so, many of the utilities have submitted license renewal to extend the operation of existing reactors from their original 40 year license to 60 years. Nearly all of them have submitted, except some of the single unit owners. And now they're thinking about extending the 60 year license to 80 years because they feel very strongly that this can still be operated safely and reliably. So that's another piece of good news. And of course, we talked about SMRs. The Biden administration is supporting SMRs. I've seen some very good press on SMR startups that are quite deeply involved looking at different coolant, instead of looking at water, looking at molten salt, molten fluoride salts. I think this adds to the excitement that nuclear energy can bring in introducing new technologies that could support climate change challenges. So I feel very bullish about what can happen.

Matt Chester: 
The next episode that I've kept in mind was one where we got two guests in one hearing from Jeremy Renshaw of EPRI about how they helped the utility Ameren to utilize artificial intelligence in their practice. From the Ameren side, we were fortunate to hear from CTO Bhavani Amirthlingam who had recently been named one of the top 50 innovative tech leaders by Forbes. This all took place on episode 55 AI And the Modern Utility. When setting the stage for us, I thought Bhavani did a great job highlighting succinctly how and why all utility leaders should be thinking about AI.

Bhavani Amirthlingam: 
Sure, artificial intelligence quite frankly, has been around for a long time, and what it is, is basically just machine displayed intelligence that simulates human behavior or thinking, and can be trained using data and, and to solve specific problems. And so, machines, as we know, can process more data, so greater volume, greater velocity and greater variety of data than the human mind can imagine. And AI has helped take automation to new levels. And while it's been around for a long time, as I mentioned earlier, what's really changing the game is just, if you think about the shift in compute and storage capacities over the last several years, that significant exponential growth in the ability to process data has really taken AI to the next level. And if you think about volume of data, quite frankly, the volume of data available has outpaced even the ability to collect it and it has certainly outpaced the capacity for human processing.

Bhavani Amirthlingam:
You also have to be sensitive to, what we call, the life of the data. Data decays very rapidly with time. So to see things around technology that evolve around distributed processing, automation and AI now are critical to utilizing most of this data and time frames that the data is most valuable. That gives you a little bit, just broader view of AI in general. When you think about Ameren, we lead, quite honestly, our industry overall. Few things are top of mind for us when we think about our customers. It is reliable, affordable, safe, secure, clean energy. So leveraging AI to really enhance the reliability and resiliency of our grid, helping our customers monitor energy usage, driving energy efficiency efforts, driving customer affordability, enriching customer experiences are all key items on our AI agenda.

Matt Chester: 
And the last episode that really spoke to me was another two guest episode we did more recently. The smart electric power lines listed Seattle City Light on their utility transformation challenge leaderboard. So we just had to have representatives from both SEPA and Seattle City Light on the podcast so they could share more. We did just that in the two part episode, spanning episodes, 58 and 59, both entitled Setting an Example, for Utilities via SEPA's Utility Transformation Challenge with SEPA's Sharon Allan and Seattle City Light CEO, Debra Smith. What struck me was the common viewpoint these two leaders had when discussing how to embrace leadership and innovation from a workforce level. Here's Debra first and she'll be followed by Sharon.

Debra Smith: 
So what we do is we're trying to work hard within a matrix management role, is hard. Right now our folks in innovation and electrification are working extremely closely with both our traditional engineering shops, because what we want is we want people to learn from each other. We don't want to leave employees behind anymore than we want to leave customers behind. So we want there to be an opportunity for folks to crosswalk and expand their knowledge and the tools in their chest. And then we've got the same thing happening with energy efficiency. Energy and innovation or electrification and innovation shop, they develop these new products and services that are in response to what our customers want, and then they pass them over, and then we have another shop that does a lot of the implementation.

Sharon Allan: 
As I listened Debra speak I wanted to start saying "hallelujah, yeah." A couple of points that I just want to reiterate because I thought they were very profound is as she was speaking, she said, we need both groups. Sometimes when people talk about cultural and generation change, people insinuate like younger, early career people are more technology and free thinking, and the people who are more seasoned been around are old school and can't change. And that kind of bifurcated thinking is absolutely destructive. And so when you look at the overall cultural change, you've got to have new ideation working with people who have been performing traditional and critical function, because there is a fair amount of knowledge that is institutionalized in the brains of some of our employees within utilities. And as we begin to invest and automate in things, we've got to make sure that we've gotten the institutional knowledge that exists within the brains of our employees considered so that we continue with change to keep our grid reliable and safe and economic.

Jason Price: 
Terrific. Thanks Matt. And now I guess it's my turn. It is tough to pick favorites. I walked away from each of these discussions with a greater appreciation of the work these leaders do. With that said I'm mandated here to choose only three, which I'm happy to share. I'll start with my interview back in March with Garrick Rochow CEO of Consumers Energy. Garrick stepped into big shoes, left behind by Patti Poppe who took the helm of the behemoth PG&E. What I admire about Garrick is his passion for change and use the term catalyst to describe this movement for change he's instilling at consumers. Let's take a listen to this clip from episode 34 called Rising to the Moment, but Creating a Movement with Garrick Rochow CEO of Consumers Energy.

Garrick Rochow: 
Often we talk about what I call catalysts and what catalysts are, is really a springboard that again, move us forward in our strategic direction, net zero carbon by 2040 is example. These catalysts are how we measure, they become proof points. And the proof point is in fact, the documentation that we are moving along that path. And so I look for these catalysts, I look to see that we are making progress on our journey, and we measure these across the company, we measure them in terms of our strategic roadmaps and these catalytic type events that other springboards that move us forward.

Jason Price: 
Another moment that stood out for me was in June episode 48, entitled Elevating Customer Care for Electric Cooperative Members with Sean Vanslyke, CEO of SEMO Electric Cooperative. SEMO stands for Southeast Missouri Electric Cooperative. If you follow on LinkedIn, you'll find Sean is an interesting and colorful man. Prior to leading SEMO he worked for Ameren, the big IOU in the Midwest. So Sean has experienced both the big and small. For his commitment to the community and impression on stakeholders he told us about SEMO Camp that he runs for the public and his employees. Let's take a listen.

Sean Vanslyke: 
And I'd seen that at the IOU world and tried to work on it there. And here, because we're so nimble and we can make decisions, we started a program called Camp SEMO. And what that allowed was our employees to actually rotate through every department over a one day period or two day period, and they got to see how each department fits together. So, in the morning we started at 7:30 with safety, then eight o'clock, they go to member services, and then they go to billing and go to accounting and go metering and dispatch, and they rotate through the day like that. And then in the afternoon, they go out and ride with a one man service truck for the afternoon. And in the evening we fly them up 50 feet into a bucket truck. And then when they come in on Tuesdays, they go with the construction crews and we put a shovel in their hand and get out there and probably put a pole in the ground and then the afternoon they do a fiber installation, they do a drop and they do an install.

Jason Price: 
The final one to discuss that I believe we found to be an exceptional discussion, was around the topic of the digital customer journey for customers in episode 56, titled Utility Data Journey with Mike Murphy of Con Edison and Paul DeCotis of West Monroe. To level set here, Con Edison is striving to become customer centric, much like Amazon and Apple, and this is a major undertaking. I love getting these two guys in the room and hear what they have to say. So let's hear Mike first on the customer journey that Con Edison is building

Mike Murphy: 
At Con Edison, in all we do, we're focused on continuous improvement, so we're excited about what we're working on, but there's always opportunity to improve. And so a couple things I think that have worked for us, and I would share with others that are starting this journey, I think it's really important to strike the right balance of focusing on near term value for the customers and the company, but also, again, working on that cohesive strategy for customer experience and technology. And we have to build the support for customer experience programs internally and externally, and it requires the development of a customer experience strategy, and the supporting investments for that strategy to be shared with all stakeholders at all levels, from employees to regulators. And so facilitating that alignment around the strategy, and the specific investments that support it, has really helped us to be successful in our digital efforts.

Mike Murphy: 
Also, I would advise others to avoid defining too far out into the future the exact focus areas or use cases that will be addressed with digital analytic solutions. The pace of change is just so fast. We find it imperative to really think about building capabilities and ways of working that incorporate the ability to be flexible, so that when the highest value focus areas become clearer, and unexpected needs emerge, we can make sure we tackle those and are successful. So for example, we've had success at Con Edison planning digital analytics focus areas and releases quarterly, and I think that's something that I think really has helped our success.

Jason Price: 
Thanks Mike, Paul, same question for you. You've worked with plenty of utilities, so I'm sure you've seen patterns across the industry, but what advice would you give to someone listening who hasn't yet dove head first into the digitalization and database decision making?

Paul DeCotis: 
Well, Jason, I would bet that while any given utility might not have taken the plunge completely, that they are thinking about it, or have started a journey toward digitalization and analytics in some aspect of their business. I will add that digitalization is a prerequisite for rigorous data collection and advanced analytics. And it's a journey, not a destination. In theory, it would never really be completed. Advances in technology and machine learning, for example, continue to advance our thinking and expand the solution set of possibilities. So I suggest utilities develop a value proposition, as stated earlier by Mike, for digitalization and analytics to meet their corporate customer and regulatory objectives. I think they need to engage regulators and make the case as to why the investment in these core business, and IT and OT areas, benefit customers and help States and localities meet their climate and energy goals.

Jason Price: 
So, that's the rundown of the best of the best from the past year of our proud podcast. I hope if you heard something that sparked your interest and attention, you'll go back and listen to the episodes you missed. And we'll surely have links to each of these episodes in the podcast's notes.

Jason Price: 
I want to thank Matt and Audra for joining me today and the entire Energy Central team for supporting this podcast over the past year. Similarly, we want to give an end of year shout out to our podcast sponsors.

Jason Price: 
To West Monroe. West Monroe works with the nation's largest electric gas and water utilities in their telecommunication, grid modernization and digital and workforce transformations. West Monroe brings a multidisciplinary team that blends utility operations and technology expertise to address modernizing aging infrastructure advisory on transportation, electrification, ADMS deployments, data and analytics, and cybersecurity.

Jason Price: 
To Esri an international supplier of geographic information, GIS software, web GIS, and geodatabase management applications.

Jason Price: 
To Guidehouse a premier market research and advisory firm covering the global energy transformation.

Jason Price: 
To Anterix. Anterix is focused on delivering transformative broadband, enables the modernization of critical infrastructure for the energy, transportation, logistics, and other sectors of our economy.

Jason Price: 
And to ScottMadden, a management consulting firm, serving clients across the energy utility ecosystem. Areas of focus include transmission and distribution, the grid edge, generation, energy markets, rates and regulations, corporate sustainability and corporate services. The firm helps clients develop and implement strategies, improve client operations, we organize departments and entire companies and implement married initiatives.

Jason Price: 
So once again, I'm your host Jason Price. Plug in and stay fully charged in the discussion by hopping into the community at energycentral.com. And we'll see you next year at the Energy Central Power Perspectives Podcast.

 


About Energy Central Podcasts

The ‘Energy Central Power Perspectives™ Podcast’ features conversations with thought leaders in the utility sector. At least twice monthly, we connect with an Energy Central Power Industry Network community member to discuss compelling topics that impact professionals who work in the power industry. Some podcasts may be a continuation of thought-provoking posts or discussions started in the community or with an industry leader that is interested in sharing their expertise and doing a deeper dive into hot topics or issues relevant to the industry.

The ‘Energy Central Power Perspectives™ Podcast’ is the premiere podcast series from Energy Central, a Power Industry Network of Communities built specifically for professionals in the electric power industry and a place where professionals can share, learn, and connect in a collaborative environment. Supported by leading industry organizations, our mission is to help global power industry professionals work better. Since 1995, we’ve been a trusted news and information source for professionals working in the power industry, and today our managed communities are a place for lively discussions, debates, and analysis to take place. If you’re not yet a member, visit www.EnergyCentral.com to register for free and join over 200,000 of your peers working in the power industry.

The Energy Central Power Perspectives™ Podcast is hosted by Jason PriceCommunity Ambassador of Energy Central. Jason is a Business Development Executive at West Monroe, working in the East Coast Energy and Utilities Group. Jason is joined in the podcast booth by the producer of the podcast, Matt Chester, who is also the Community Manager of Energy Central and energy analyst/independent consultant in energy policy, markets, and technology.  

If you want to be a guest on a future episode of the Energy Central Power Perspectives™ Podcast, let us know! We’ll be pulling guests from our community members who submit engaging content that gets our community talking, and perhaps that next guest will be you! Likewise, if you see an article submitted by a fellow Energy Central community member that you’d like to see broken down in more detail in a conversation, feel free to send us a note to nominate them.  For more information, contact us at community@energycentral.com. Podcast interviews are free for Expert Members and professionals who work for a utility.  We have package offers available for solution providers and vendors. 

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Audra Drazga's picture
Audra Drazga on Dec 21, 2021

What a great year-end episode!  Thanks again Jason and Matt and to all of our contributors for their insights over the past year! 

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