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Temecula Valley Unified School District moves forward on sustainability and resiliency goals with the development of two solar and storage microgrids

image credit: Sage Energy Consulting

Temecula Valley Unified School District is moving forward on sustainability and resiliency with the issuance of a request for proposals (RFP) for two new solar and storage microgrids that will be managed by Sage Energy Consulting. The RFP includes two schools in the District that will host these innovative projects, including the new K8 STEAM Academy in Winchester, California, and the Rancho Elementary School in Temecula, California. The microgrids are designed for three hours or more of backup to the schools, providing power to critical loads at each campus during a grid outage and avoiding the need for diesel generators. The RFP solicits bidders to construct the solar photovoltaic (PV) and energy storage microgrids at both schools, with the option of operating and maintaining the systems. 

The new projects include a roof-mounted solar photovoltaic and battery energy storage system microgrid at the new K8 STEAM ACADEMY in Winchester, and a solar canopy and battery energy storage system microgrid at the Rancho Elementary School. Sage produced the microgrid design for the K8 STEAM site. The deadline to submit a proposal is November 6, with a pre-qualification deadline of October 23. Qualified bidders will have completed three 200 kW or larger PV projects, and two battery energy storage projects of 200 kW or larger. Temecula will select a contractor during the week of November 24, 2020, and targets contract approval by December 15, with a construction start date in March 2021, and project completion by August 2021. Additional details for submitting work can be found on the district website.

In 2016, Temecula Valley USD installed 6 MW of solar across 20 district sites, as well as 1.3 MW of energy storage/demand management at 5 district sites. The existing solar and storage projects are projected to generate well over $10 million in savings over the lifetime of the project. The new microgrids are expected to bring similar benefits to the district in addition to meeting their sustainability goals. 

 

Lauren Glickman's picture

Thank Lauren for the Post!

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