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Electric Power Sector Consumption of Fossil Fuels at Lowest Level Since 1994

U.S. electric power sector consumption of fossil fuels, as explained in the article text

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

Fossil fuel consumption in the electric power sector declined to 22.5 quadrillion British thermal units (quads) in 2017, the lowest level since 1994. The declining trend in fossil fuel consumption by the power sector has been driven by a decrease in the use of coal and petroleum with a slightly offsetting increase in the use of natural gas. Changes in the fuel mix and improvements in electricity generating technology have also led the power sector to produce electricity while consuming fewer fossil fuels.

In 2017, coal consumption by the electric power sector reached its lowest level since 1982, and petroleum consumption in the power sector was the lowest on record, based on data since 1949. Recent natural gas consumption in the power sector has generally been increasing, but 2017 consumption was slightly lower than the record-high 2016 level.

In energy-equivalent terms, more coal was consumed in the power sector than natural gas in 2017, at 12.7 quads and 9.5 quads, respectively. However, in terms of electricity generation, natural gas-fired power plants in the electric power sector produced more electricity than coal-fired plants, at 31% and 30% of the U.S. total, respectively, in 2017. Natural gas-fired units tend to be more energy efficient, requiring less energy content to produce a unit of electricity.

As recently as 2000, natural gas-fired power plants were on average about as efficient as coal-fired plants. Since then, new natural gas-fired power plants have tended to use combined-cycle generators, which are more efficient because the waste heat from the gas turbine is routed to a nearby steam turbine that generates additional power.

Combined-cycle units now make up most of the natural gas-fired electricity generation capacity. By the end of 2018, natural gas combined-cycle units may surpass conventional coal-fired power plants to become the most prevalent technology for generating electricity in the United States.

As the natural gas-fired generation fleet has grown and become more efficient, the generation-weighted average efficiency of fossil fuel-fired electricity generation has improved. In 1994, fossil fuel power plants required 10,400 British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy to produce each kilowatthour (kWh); by 2017 that rate had fallen to 9,400 Btu/kWh.

U.S. net electricity generation and heat rates from fossil fuels, as explained in the article text

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

These changes in energy consumption and efficiency have also affected carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the electric power sector, which in 2017 were the lowest since 1987. Because coal combustion is much more carbon intensive than natural gas combustion, CO2 emissions from coal were more than double those from natural gas in 2017, even though natural gas provided more electricity generation.

U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from electric power sector fossil fuels, as explained in the article text

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

More information on U.S. energy consumption and CO2 emissions across sectors is available in EIA’s Monthly Energy Review.

Principal contributors: Sara Hoff, Jason Winik

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Rex Berglund's picture
Rex Berglund on May 30, 2018

“First-fire has been achieved at NET Power’s supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO₂) power plant—a test facility in La Porte, Texas, to demonstrate the potentially revolutionary natural gas–fueled Allam Cycle. The project is designed to produce low-cost electricity from natural gas while generating near-zero atmospheric emissions, including full CO₂ capture.”

“First fire of the combustor is a remarkable milestone for the project, which broke ground in March 2016, because it validates the “fundamental operability and technical foundation” of NET Power’s power system. Successful operation of the project could allow the company to develop larger 300-MWe commercial-scale plants as early as 2021.”

“For now, at least, NET Power’s 50-MWth (25-MWe) demonstration plant is the world’s only industrial-scale supercritical carbon dioxide-based power plant and CO₂ cycle test facility.”

The advent of a way to burn methane while capturing all CO2 at no cost means that the nat gas boom that ensued from fracking can now be carbon neutral, if the CO2 is sequestered and fugitive emissions are reined in.

More importantly, if the input were biomethane sequestration would make the process carbon negative, even accounting for any fugitive emissions.

If such plants were used to balance the intermittency of solar and wind, the electric grid could actually become carbon negative.

Joe Deely's picture
Joe Deely on Jun 2, 2018

The declining trend in fossil fuel consumption by the power sector has been driven by a decrease in the use of coal and petroleum with a slightly offsetting increase in the use of natural gas. Changes in the fuel mix and improvements in electricity generating technology have also led the power sector to produce electricity while consuming fewer fossil fuels.

Translation:
An increase in total amount of renewable generation since 2007 has driven a decrease in the total amount of fossil fuel based generation. There has also been some benefit in the efficiency of fossil fuel based generation caused the movement of share from coal plants to NG plants.

Note: Total generation has been flat to down in this time period.

Trend = Renewables up and fossil fuels down.

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