WOGNEWS

WOGNEWS, Global Energy Market News is a publicly available information portal about the global energy market and industry. The portal contains information in text, video and photo formats since January, 2014.

Post

GLOBAL NUCLEAR POWER DOWN

Posted to WOGNEWS

image credit: GLOBAL NUCLEAR POWER DOWN

WNN published.

Global nuclear generating capacity stood at 392.4 GWe net at the end of 2019, down slightly on 2018, according to data from World Nuclear Association. Six power reactors were added to the grid last year and construction of three large reactor projects started, while nine units were permanently shut down.

Six new nuclear power reactors with a combined generating capacity of 5241 MWe came on line in 2019. Two of these - Taishan 2 and Yangjiang 6 - were in China. Unit 4 of South Korea's Shin Kori plant was also connected to the grid, as was Russia's Novovoronezh II unit 2. Russia's first floating nuclear power plant, the Akademik Lomonosov - comprising two 32 MWe reactors - was also connected to the grid towards the end the year.

In 2018, 10,420 MWe of new nuclear generating capacity was connected to the grid, while 3345 MWe was added in 2017.

Power uprates at existing reactors also added 212 MWe of generating capacity during 2019. Some 35 MWe was added at the Embalse plant in Argentina, while 155 MWe and 22 MWe were added at the USA's Browns Ferry 2 and Peach Bottom 2 units, respectively. In comparison, four uprates in the USA added 350 MWe of capacity in 2018.

Construction was started last year of three new power reactors: unit 2 of the Kursk II plant in Russia; unit 1 of China's Zhangzhou plant; and unit 2 of Iran's Bushehr plant.

Nine power reactors with a combined capacity of 5976 MWe were officially shut down in 2019. These were Bilibino 1 in Russia, Chinshan 2 in Taiwan, Genkai 2 in Japan, Mühleberg in Switzerland, Philippsburg 2 in Germany, Pilgrim in the USA, Ringhals 2 in Sweden and Three Mile Island 1 in the USA. Unit 1 of South Korea's Wolsong plant, which had not operated since June 2018, was declared as having been shut down on 24 December.

At the end of 2019, there were 442 reactors operable around the world, totalling 392.4 GWe net, and 54 under construction (59.9 GWe gross).

Vladimir Vinogradov's picture

Thank Vladimir for the Post!

Energy Central contributors share their experience and insights for the benefit of other Members (like you). Please show them your appreciation by leaving a comment, 'liking' this post, or following this Member.

WOGNEWS
WOGNEWS, Global Energy Market News is a publicly available information portal about the global energy market and industry. The portal contains information in text, video and photo formats since January, 2014.

Discussions

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Jan 6, 2020 4:39 pm GMT

Vladimir, not sure the capitals in your title are warranted. The .3% drop in capacity last year is surely a blip on the radar,

Generation has been consistently higher each year since 2011, when everyone took a deep breath and got on with the business of pursuing effective solutions to climate change. Global generation numbers for 2019 aren't available yet, but it's likely generation continued its upward trend.

Vladimir Vinogradov's picture
Vladimir Vinogradov on Jan 8, 2020 6:54 am GMT

Bob, this is last year information only. It don't show a general trend, I hope. Information over long periods of time shows an increasing interest in nuclear energy. OPEC, IEA, EIA write about it in their forecasts. They argue that nuclear power is a very important part of world energy.

Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Jan 6, 2020 5:15 pm GMT

How do these compare with forecasts for 2020 to 2024 or so?

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Jan 6, 2020 5:39 pm GMT

Matt, in general that depends who's doing the forecasting. IAEA, which arguably has skin in the game, says:

"In some regions, over the short term the low price of natural gas and the impact of subsidized renewable energy sources are expected to continue to affect nuclear power’s growth prospects. Still, interest in nuclear power remains strong in several regions, particularly in the developing world, and commitments agreed under the Paris Agreement and other initiatives have the potential to support its development."

Get Published - Build a Following

The Energy Central Power Industry Network is based on one core idea - power industry professionals helping each other and advancing the industry by sharing and learning from each other.

If you have an experience or insight to share or have learned something from a conference or seminar, your peers and colleagues on Energy Central want to hear about it. It's also easy to share a link to an article you've liked or an industry resource that you think would be helpful.

                 Learn more about posting on Energy Central »