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What's behind $15,000 electricity bills in Texas?

Source: 
The Conversation

Texans who made it through February's extreme cold weather without losing power or natural gas must have felt lucky. But for some, keeping their electricity through the blackout may turn out to be more traumatic than losing it. An undetermined number of homeowners have been shocked to receive bills running into the thousands of dollars – in some cases, over US$15,000 for a month's worth of ...

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Richard Gibson's picture
Richard Gibson on Feb 25, 2021

Please note that in the ERCOT market, you cannot elect to receive a retail supply of electricity from one of the five investor-owned utilities.

The "stricker shock" is largely limited to customers of a single retailer.  The number of customers served by that retailer is known.

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Feb 25, 2021

"Please note that in the ERCOT market, you cannot elect to receive a retail supply of electricity from one of the five investor-owned utilities."

Sounds like ERCOT's fake "market" forces electricity customers to pay a middle man for no added value. Not convenience, not choice, nothing.

And that's enshrined in Texas law? If so, it's arguably a violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act...maybe Biden's SEC will bring the hammer down. If so, it won't be a moment too soon.

Jim Stack's picture
Jim Stack on Feb 25, 2021

So do they also pay people like me with solar who make more than we use the same thou$and$ of dollars they charge? That is how Net-Metering is supposed to work. 

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Feb 26, 2021

"That is how Net-Metering is supposed to work."

Net metering was never "supposed to" force utilities to subsidize home solar generators for the full cost of welcoming their meager, unpredictable generation online.

Do you pay the costs other ratepayers incur when your utility needs to provide backup power for your solar panels? What about the costs of regulating the voltage/frequency instabilities they introduce? I didn't think so.

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