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Microgrids Are Quickly Becoming a Top Solution to Energy Problems

Source: 
Global Energy World

Microgrids are becoming essential for millions of people around the world. After earthquakes and aftershocks left Puerto Rico without power, microgrids installed at 10 schools continue to run, providing power to residents. When PG&E shut off power in California to battle high winds and fires, No...

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Gary Hilberg's picture
Gary Hilberg on Jan 27, 2020 7:54 pm GMT

Microgrids provide two key value added services:

1.  Reliability.  Most existing backup power systems require a total loss of utility supply prior to engaging, they cannot synchronize with the Grid.   With microgrids, this can be solved allowing the host to selectively engage their backup power units, keep their processes/facilities running and transition from the Grid with the loss of any production.  Then when the crisis is over, they can re-synchronize with the grid seamlessly.

2.  Generation integration.  With a microgrid, the host can bring all types of generation/energy storage to the grid, adding value distributed generation and supporting ancilliary services for the Grid.  This generation can be renewable or even the periodic use of traditional backup generators to provide more overall Grid reliability.

There are many suppliers in the microgrid space with the unit and system controls necessary to allows this integration.   Certainly a great first step for any user that is looking for additional reliability and/or cash flow from new/existing distributed generation assets.  

Noam Mayraz's picture
Noam Mayraz on Feb 27, 2020 3:02 pm GMT

Gary Hilberg - was all due respect every word in the above comment, as posted by you, is pure nonsense. 

You have no clue about the subject and it shows.

What you described is a standard, ages old grid operation, where every producer is connected to the grid and contributes as available / needed.

There is nothing special that your nonsense "Micro Grid" has to offer.  That's all there is to that.

One Double Observation:

"With a microgrid, the host can bring all types of generation/energy storage to the grid."  Is a pure BS due to two (2) simple facts:

1. This is how the conventional grid currently operates.

2. There is no such thing as "energy storage".  Pump storage facilities have been in operation for years on no end.  Batteries for storing grid electrical energy do not exists.

Executive Summary: 

Buy a few books on the subject matter and start with Grid 101 in a college of your choice.

 

Gary Hilberg's picture
Gary Hilberg on Feb 28, 2020 8:24 pm GMT

Noam very rude and agressive words which I will ignore.  Your purported knowledge is incorrect as utilties do not allow uncontrolled connections to their systems which is the point of the original article.  Your book theory is way off base, maybe a bit of the real world would help.  

Noam Mayraz's picture
Noam Mayraz on Mar 3, 2020 12:17 pm GMT

Gary, maybe we have miscommunication here.  
 

I stated that there is no such thing as micro grids. 

We call those "distributed generation". 
 

True that if those independent, small generators elect not to connect to the grid they would be "micro grids", but then again, they will not be allowed to connect even in emergencie. 
 

You cannot have those at changing applications.  Either they are part of the grid or not.  Connection to the grid requires compliance.  That's all there is to that.  Noam

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