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AES Distributed Energy is chosen for 2 projects

Source: 
Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Jun. 2--AES Distributed Energy, a division of The AES Corp., was selected by Hawaiian Electric Cos. to develop and operate two new utility-scale solar-plus-storage facilities on Oahu. The two projects combined are expected to generate 137, 000 megawatt-hours of locally produced, reliable renewable energy, serving upward of 23, 000 homes.

One of AES' projects will be a 19.5-megawatt direct-current photovoltaic facility paired with a 35-megawatt-hour battery energy storage system, and the other will be a 60-megawatt direct-current PV facility paired with a 240-megawatt-hour battery energy storage system.

Construction of these projects is expected to begin in 2022, pending all applicable permitting and approvals, with completion scheduled for 2023.

Oshima featured in economic webinar The Hawaii Economic Association will host a webinar at noon Thursday that will focus on the state's path to economic recovery and feature former Hawaiian Electric President and CEO Alan Oshima, the Hawaii Economic and Community Recovery & Resiliency navigator. The presentation will be followed by a question-and-answer session with HEA President Lesley Harvey held directly and from webinar attendees.

Oshima was recently tasked by Gov. David Ige to develop and implement the state's plans for economic and community stabilization, recovery and resilience.

Registration is free.

Reservations can be made at.

Hawaii American Water purchases Waimea firm Hawaii American Water said Monday it has acquired the assets and operations of the Waimea Wastewater Co. and is the new wastewater service provider for those customers.

Big Island-based Waimea Wastewater is a regulated wastewater utility that serves about 217 residential and commercial connections, including North Hawaii Community Hospital and the Parker Ranch Center.

Hawaii American Water currently provides wastewater service to more than 10, 000 residential and commercial connections in Hawaii Kai and at the Mauna Lani Resort on the Big Island.

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(c)2020 The Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Visit The Honolulu Star-Advertiser at www.staradvertiser.com

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Discussions

Joe Deely's picture
Joe Deely on Jun 2, 2020 9:22 pm GMT

Good to see Hawaii cleaning up its grid which has largely been based on oil and coal till recently.

 

One of AES' projects will be a 19.5-megawatt direct-current photovoltaic facility paired with a 35-megawatt-hour battery energy storage system, and the other will be a 60-megawatt direct-current PV facility paired with a 240-megawatt-hour battery energy storage system.

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Jun 2, 2020 11:38 pm GMT

Sad to see Hawaii's grid is still largely based on oil and coal, and will remain so for the foreseeable future.

Joe Deely's picture
Joe Deely on Jun 3, 2020 8:42 pm GMT

Sad to see Hawaii's grid is still largely based on oil and coal, and will remain so for the foreseeable future.

Love it Bob...

Why don't the two of us keep track of where the "puck" moves to in Hawaii over the next few years.  

As a start - here are  current capacity figures for main fuel types:

Capacity at end of Mar 2020

  • 1,880 MW of Petroleum
  • 180 MW of Coal
  • 0 MW of NG
  • 205 MW of Wind
  • 268 MW of Utility Scale Solar - up from 124 MW 12 months ago (all added in Q4 2019)
  • 678 MW of Small Scale Solar up from 614 MW 12 months ago

Note: as your chart and my numbers show Utility-Scale solar was almost non-existest in Hawaii at start of 2019.  

Let's see where things are at by end of 2022 when the only coal plant in Hawaii - AES 180 MW - loses its contract and is closed.

The 180-megawatt AES Hawaii power plant at Campbell Industrial Park is currently the largest single generator on the Hawaiian Electric system, providing 16 percent of the peak demand on Oahu. It is slated to close by September 2022. On Maui, the Kahului Power Plant is expected to close by the end of 2024.

Gonna be a lot more utility scale solar over the next few years. Plus, let's not forget the storage.

Hawaiian Electric this week selected 16 winning solar-storage and standalone battery projects totaling 460 megawatts of solar capacity and nearly 3 gigawatt-hours of storage as the utility moves to close fossil fuel plants in the state.  

Interesting - 3 gigawatt hours = a 180MW coal plant running flat out for over 16 hours. Coincidence?

 

Was wondering Bob - can look into your crystal ball and make some more predictions about some nearby Western states - Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, etc..

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Jun 4, 2020 2:01 pm GMT

Making baseless predictions about the future is the domain of renewables evangelists, doomsday prophets, hucksters of salvation, and tarot readers. Not my domain.

Joe Deely's picture
Joe Deely on Jun 4, 2020 7:16 pm GMT

Making baseless predictions about the future is the domain of renewables evangelists, doomsday prophets, hucksters of salvation, and tarot readers. Not my domain.

Thats too bad... because in general we can depend on the opposite of whatever you say happening. Sort of like the EIA Annual Outlooks.

Sad to see Hawaii's grid is still largely based on oil and coal, and will remain so for the foreseeable future.

Curious when you made this prediction - what did you base it on? The graph of previous generation in Hawaii??

Let's see if your record holds up with this one Bob.

 

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