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MISO says Transmission Owners are responsible for Generator Interconnection Queue delays

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Independent Consultant Rakon Energy LLC

Rao Konidena found Rakon Energy LLC because Rao is passionate about connecting clients to cost-effective solutions in energy consulting, storage, distributed energy resources, and electricity...

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  • Nov 30, 2020
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In the latest 3rd qtr FERC status report on Generator Interconnection requests, MISO points to MISO Transmission Owners as one of the contributing factors for delays in processing interconnection customer requests.

" Approximately 18 days of this delay can be attributed to the need to shift internal MISO resources as a result of staff changes occurring prior to the Phase 1 study start date. The remaining 37 days of delay occurred once the Phase 1 study had started and were the result of: (1) model rework necessitated by inconsistency in several Interconnection Customers’ proposed Points of Interconnection and supporting data that came to light during the model review period, (2)Transmission Owners needing more time than expected tocomplete final impact mitigation studies for 64 projects, totaling $2.5 billion in needed mitigations (i.e. Network Upgrades), and (3) additional time needed to finalize the study report based on iterative comments and corrections submitted by Interconnection Customers commensurate with the scale of the upgrades. "

Source: https://cdn.misoenergy.org/2020-11-16_Docket%20No.%20ER19-1960-004494613.pdf

This is the key metric to follow at each RTO, " Mean time (in days), for all withdrawn Interconnection Service requests, from the date when the request was determined to be valid to when Transmission Provider received the request to withdraw from the queue "

which is 592 days for SPP (Source: http://opsportal.spp.org/documents/studies/Order845Metrics.pdf )

722 days for NYISO (Source: https://www.nyiso.com/documents/20142/12339243/LF-Interconnection-Study-Metrics-3rd-Quarter-2020.pdf/cd7a61f1-92a5-6c0e-c4b4-6719164ee6cf

447 days for MISO (Source: link above) and only 178 days for CAISO (Source: http://www.caiso.com/Documents/FERC845_InterconnectionStudyStatistics.pdf

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