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Richard Brooks's picture
Co-Founder and Lead Software Engineer Reliable Energy Analytics LLC

Inventor of patent pending (16/933161) technology: METHODS FOR VERIFICATION OF SOFTWARE OBJECT AUTHENTICITY AND INTEGRITY and the Software Assurance Guardian™ (SAG ™) Point Man™ (SAG-PM™)...

  • Member since 2018
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  • Oct 21, 2021
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Now that's a regulator with good business sense and a practical understanding of what needs to happen to address climate change! (link below)

Electrify everything!

When customers fuel these new products using cleaner and cleaner electricity, they will reduce climate pollution compared to the status quo.

The wrong approach will send the wrong price signals to consumers.

Two things need to be true to motivate consumers to switch to cleaner electric fuel. First, electric vehicles and heating systems need to be affordable at the point of purchase. Second, clean electricity must be as cheap as possible, and cheap relative to transportation and heating fuels.

Increasing the price of electricity is a bad way to convince consumers to use more of it.

collecting the funds needed to accelerate electrification from anywhere other than electric bills will be a more productive approach than adding charges to electric bills.

Success will mean that electric rates stay low enough to attract transportation and heating consumers. Utilities' priority must be delivering clean, reliable power as efficiently as possible

 

 

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Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Oct 21, 2021

Dick, you really believe utilities will keep prices low, that they'll clean up generation, when they're making more money selling dirty electricity?

"...collecting the funds needed to accelerate electrification from anywhere other than electric bills will be a more productive approach than adding charges to electric bills."

Where do you suggest these funds be collected?

Richard Brooks's picture
Richard Brooks on Oct 24, 2021

Bob, I must admit that collecting the funds needed is one of the challenges, but it's not insurmountable. Reliable electricity is not free, so the money to pay for reliable electric service comes from somewhere, and we all know that "Load pays for everything" when it comes to electricity. So the answer is that load will pay, just like it does today. But if we can keep the electricity price from rising above today's levels and we are able to produce energy at less cost, i.e. no fuel expenses like solar, then we stand a chance to see lower prices and lower GHG emissions in the future. I sincerely doubt we will ever operate the grid without nuclear and some relatively clean fossil fueled generators, i.e. Natural Gas, but the big dirty generators need to be replaced, and that's going to take some up-front capital investments, that ultimately, "Load will pay for".

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Oct 25, 2021

"But if we can keep the electricity price from rising above today's levels and we are able to produce energy at less cost, i.e. no fuel expenses like solar, then we stand a chance to see lower prices and lower GHG emissions in the future."

or:

"If all countries in the world would work together, and convince their citizens to understand the dire consequences we will all face if we don't use more energy from the sun and the wind, then we stand a chance to see lower prices and lower GHG emissions in the future."

I'm not being facetious - this is what 20,000 diplomats from 180 countries will gather to discuss Sunday in Glasgow. There's no evidence either goal is something more than an empty dream, no roadmap, no incentive, no prior examples to support it. I can predict with confidence either has the chance of a snowball in hell, and my prediction does have an empirical basis.

Germany is farther along than any other country on the Grand Renewables Experiment - a developed country, with unparalleled access to technology and resources. The Energiewende began three decades ago; now, after an estimated €520 billion has been spent, it's going down in flames.

Germany 'set for biggest rise in greenhouse gases in 30 years'

We don't have 30 more years to waste.

Richard Brooks's picture
Richard Brooks on Oct 26, 2021

"We don't have 30 more years to waste."

I agree, Bob - that's why we need to start building out the transmission network and aggressively start implementing small nuclear reactors with fail-safe implementations spread across the country along the transmission build out. We can't get there on solar and wind alone. I don't see another viable approach to reduce GHG to acceptable levels.

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Oct 28, 2021

Dick, since you began posting on EnergyCentral you seem to have become more receptive to the idea nuclear energy will play a huge part in addressing climate change. I'd like to think I had something to do with that, but maybe not. Either way, it gives me hope that a Senior Consultant for ISONE recognizes its value.

Nuclear energy faces strong headwinds, but none of them are based in physics or technology. They're based in long-established biases that, I believe, can be overcome. If they can't, they will eventually be supplanted by fear of climate change - when its impacts have become too serious to ignore. But by then, of course, it will be too late.

Richard Brooks's picture
Richard Brooks on Oct 29, 2021

Bob, based on my experiences, people in the energy industry accept nuclear as a safe, reliable zero-emission electric supply. The objectors to nuclear that I've met come from outside the energy industry.

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