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Jaber Abosaag's picture
Founder of Green Chem , Green Chem
  • Member since 2023
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  • Jan 12, 2023
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Magnesium extraction from desalination plant brine water can be done through a number of different processes, and the best method will depend on a variety of factors such as the specific characteristics of the brine water and the desired end product.

 

One common method for extracting magnesium from brine water is through the process of electrolysis, in which an electric current is passed through the brine solution to separate out the magnesium ions. Another method is by using a process called membrane separation, which uses a semi-permeable membrane to separate the magnesium ions from the brine water.

 

A specific process of magnesium extraction called Reverse osmosis-electrodialysis which is a combination of these two processes and specifically designed for desalination plant brine water, it is considered to be more environmentally friendly because it uses less energy compared to other methods, and it also produces less waste.

 

The process of electrolysis is a method of using electrical energy to separate a compound into its component parts. In the case of magnesium extraction from desalination plant brine water, the process involves using an electrical current to separate out the magnesium ions from the other ions in the brine solution.

 

The basic setup for this process involves two electrodes, one of which is made of magnesium and the other is made of an inert material such as graphite. The electrodes are placed in the brine solution and a current is passed through the solution. The magnesium ions in the brine solution are attracted to the magnesium electrode, where they are deposited and can be collected.

 

During the electrolysis process, magnesium ions in the brine water will be attracted to the magnesium electrode (positively charged anode), and under the influence of an electric current they will be deposited on the electrode surface. While, on the other hand, chloride ions in the brine water will be attracted to the negatively charged electrode (graphite cathode) where they will be oxidized to chlorine gas.

 

The process requires significant energy input, and the by-product is the salt (NaCl) which can be further filtered. Also, the potential side effects like pH changes, temperature change and precipitation of other salts need to be monitored as well.

  

The process of membrane separation uses a semi-permeable membrane to separate ions in a solution based on their size, charge, or other characteristics. In the case of magnesium extraction from desalination plant brine water, the process involves passing the brine water through a membrane that allows magnesium ions to pass through, while retaining other ions such as sodium and chloride.

 

There are several different types of membrane separation techniques that can be used for magnesium extraction, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. One common type is called electrodialysis (ED), which uses an electric field to drive ions through the membrane. Another type is called reverse osmosis (RO), which uses pressure to force water through the membrane.

 

In the electrodialysis, a stream of brine water is passed through a series of compartments separated by ion-exchange membranes. The compartments are alternately connected to positive and negative electrodes. This creates an electric potential gradient across the membranes, and ions will be driven through the membrane in the direction of the gradient.

 

In reverse osmosis, a brine water stream is pushed through a semi-permeable membrane using high pressure. The membrane only allows smaller molecules, such as water and small ions such as magnesium, to pass through, while larger ions such as sodium and chloride are blocked by the membrane.

 

Both of these techniques are considered to be relatively efficient methods for extracting magnesium from brine water, but they require a significant amount of energy and also produce large amounts of concentrated brine as a waste product, which also needs to be considered as part of the environmental impact study.

In addition, membrane separation processes can be affected by factors such as membrane fouling and scaling, which can reduce the efficiency of the process over time and require frequent cleaning or replacement of the membrane.

 

Reverse osmosis-electrodialysis (RO-ED) is a combination of the reverse osmosis and electrodialysis processes for extracting magnesium from desalination plant brine water.

 

The basic setup for this process involves passing the brine water through a reverse osmosis membrane to remove most of the salt, then passing the resulting water through an electrodialysis system. The electrodialysis system uses a series of ion-exchange membranes to separate the remaining ions in the water based on their charge, with the magnesium ions passing through the membrane and being collected.

 

During the process, the brine water stream is passed through a reverse osmosis membrane where large ions like chloride and sodium are retained while small ions such as magnesium and water are passed. This stream then passed through electrodialysis compartments separated by ion-exchange membranes. The compartments are alternately connected to positive and negative electrodes. This creates an electric potential gradient across the membranes, and ions will be driven through the membrane in the direction of the gradient.

 

One of the main advantages of this process is that it is able to produce a high-purity magnesium concentrate while at the same time reducing the volume of waste brine. It's also considered to be more energy efficient compared to using either reverse osmosis or electrodialysis alone.

 

However, reverse osmosis-electrodialysis process also comes with its own set of challenges and limitations. For instance, the RO membrane is prone to scaling and fouling which may require regular cleaning and replacement. Also, the cost of the process could be quite high. As with any process, it's important to conduct a detailed environmental impact study before making a final decision.

 

           Magnesium extraction from desalination plant brine water can be done using solar energy in the form of a solar thermal process. In this process, solar energy is used to heat the brine water, which increases the solubility of the magnesium ions and allows them to be more easily separated from the other ions in the solution.

 

This method of solar magnesium extraction is called solar thermal electrolysis, in which solar energy is used to heat the brine water to high temperatures and an electric current is passed through the solution to separate the magnesium ions. The solar thermal energy is used to provide the heat necessary to drive the electrolysis reaction, and the electricity to power the process can be generated by solar panels.

 

Another possible method of solar magnesium extraction is called solar thermal vaporization, in which solar energy is used to vaporize the brine water, and the resulting vapor is condensed to collect the magnesium ions.

 

These processes use the heat from solar energy to extract magnesium from brine water, which could be a more sustainable and environmentally friendly method compared to traditional extraction methods. However, the efficiency of these processes is highly dependent on the location and weather conditions, and it's also necessary to consider the life-cycle costs, including the costs of solar thermal systems, energy storage and conversion.

 

It is worth noting that Solar thermal processes of magnesium extraction are still in the research and development stage and not yet commercialized, hence more research and development is needed before it could be considered as a reliable and cost-effective alternative.

 

           Solar evaporation is another method for extracting magnesium from desalination plant brine water that uses solar energy. This process involves using the sun's energy to evaporate the water in the brine solution, leaving behind the magnesium ions and other dissolved minerals.

 

One possible method of solar evaporation is called solar pond, it's a man-made shallow pond or basin with a depth of a few meters that uses solar energy to heat the brine water and cause evaporation. The pond is designed with a transparent surface to allow sunlight to penetrate the water and to minimize heat loss. As the brine water evaporates, the dissolved magnesium ions will concentrate in the remaining water, which is then extracted.

 

Another method of solar evaporation is called solar still, it's a device that uses the sun's energy to heat the brine water and cause evaporation. The water vapor is then collected and condensed, leaving behind the dissolved magnesium ions.

Solar evaporation process is considered as a low energy method for magnesium extraction and considered environmentally friendly as it requires low energy inputs and does not produce waste. However, the process is highly dependent on weather conditions, and the process could be disrupted by cloudy weather. Also, the process has a lower extraction rate compared to other methods.

 

It's worth noting that these methods of magnesium extraction through solar evaporation are not yet widely commercialized, more research and development is needed to improve their efficiency and scalability

 

           The amount of magnesium that needs to be extracted to make the process economically viable and competitive will depend on a number of factors such as the cost of the extraction process, the price of magnesium on the market, and the scale of the operation.

 

Generally speaking, the larger the scale of the operation, the lower the unit cost of production will be. This is because many of the costs, such as equipment and labor, are fixed costs that do not change significantly with the scale of the operation. Therefore, a larger scale operation will be able to spread these costs over a larger amount of magnesium, resulting in a lower unit cost of production.

 

It's also important to consider the efficiency of the process, as a more efficient process will be able to extract more magnesium from the brine water with the same amount of energy and resources. And, of course, the price of magnesium in the market, as it affects the final competitiveness of the extracted product,

However, there is no set number or percentage of magnesium that needs to be extracted to make the process competitive as the overall viability of the project depends on many factors such as location, resources availability and environmental impact. It's suggested to conduct a detailed financial and technical feasibility study to determine the optimal extraction rate, production scale and costs to make the process economically viable and competitive. 

           It's difficult to say which process of magnesium extraction from desalination plant brine water is the most environmentally friendly without knowing the specific details of the situation. Each process has its own advantages and disadvantages, and the most environmentally friendly option will depend on a variety of factors such as the location, availability of resources, and the disposal method of waste products.

That being said, some of the ways to make any of the above process environmentally friendly is to minimize the waste generation, use of renewable energy sources, and minimize the use of chemicals.

For example, using reverse osmosis-electrodialysis process may be more environmentally friendly than using reverse osmosis or electrodialysis alone, because it produces a higher-purity magnesium concentrate and reduces the volume of waste brine, reducing the environmental impact of disposing of it. Additionally, implementing energy recovery systems or using renewable energy sources to power the process can help to reduce the energy consumption and carbon footprint of the process.

 

Another aspect to consider is the reusability and recycling of the byproducts and process waste. For instance, waste brine can be used for other applications like industrial uses or treated for agricultural use.

 

           

#saudivision2030,

#MagnesiumExtraction#BrineWater,#Desalination,#SustainableMining,

#RenewableEnergy,#EnvironmentallyFriendly,#SolarEnergy,#SolarThermal,

#SolarEvaporation,#WaterManagement,#MineralExtraction,#IndustryInnovations,

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Thank Jaber for the Post!
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