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Smartphone Sales Boom

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Paul Korzeniowski's picture
B2B Content producer Self-employed

Paul is a seasoned (basically old) freelance B2B content producer. Through the years, he has written more than 10,000 items (blogs, news stories, white papers, case studies, press releases and...

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  • Jul 27, 2021 10:34 am GMT
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The pandemic caused a slowdown in smartphone purchases in 2020, but that market is roaring back in 2021. In fact, Gartner Inc. found that worldwide smartphone sales grew 26% in first quarter of 2021. Given the momentum, energy companies need to prepare to make these devices a key part of their technology arsenal.

A number of factors slowed smartphone adoption in 2020. The market reached an inflection point. New 5G devices, which mesh well with emerging edge applications, were on the docket. Rather than buy 4G devices, businesses waited for the new models.

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Also, the pandemic had a chilling impact on sales. Energy companies put smartphone purchases on hold as they rewrote their business plans.

Concerns arose around smartphone availability. The worldwide closing of country borders wreaked havoc with global supply chains. Microprocessors, which are the foundation for smartphones, was one niche where demand outstripped supply, casting doubt on smartphone availability.

What a Difference a Year Makes

The new year eased the concerns. New 5G devices, such as the Apple iPhone 12, hit the market. Emerging edge applications, like workforce management, mesh with the emerging networking features. By adopting it, technicians enter information quickly on intuitive devices rather than slog through complex paper documents.

Furthermore, utilities are investing in new technology in order to meet new business drivers. Virtual communication and remote work have become quite common. In a growing number of cases, employees access company information via smartphones rather than desktop PCs.

Supply chain concerns have been easing. Countries have loosened restrictions as vaccines have become more widely available. Gradually, they are catching up with product shortfalls.

Smartphone Momentum Builds  

As a result, unit sales rose from 300,041.1 in early 2020, to 377,990.7 in 2021. Yet, the market remained largely a two horse race between Samsung and Apple. The former had success with its launch of mid-priced smartphones, priced under $150.

Moving forward, lower pricing and new applications are expected to continue the momentum seem in the first quarter. So, utilities need to extend their technology policies, so they accommodate the devices.

Management is one area that may need attention. Employees prefer different types of mobile devices, however, monitoring a wide range of systems can be time consuming and expensive. Consequently, tradeoffs may have to be made.

Smartphone usage slowed in 2020 for a variety of reasons. As 2021 began, sales picked up dramatically. Consequently, energy companies need to be aware of the changing market dynamics and manage the growing use of these devices proactively.

 

 

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