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Comparing NERC 2019 and 2020 CMEP Risk Elements

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NERC’s 2020 CMEP Implementation Plan 2020 CMEP Implementation Plan identifies the number of standards and Requirements recognized as areas of focus for compliance oversight from 2019 to 2020. NERC identifies risk elements using data including, but not limited to, compliance findings, event analysis experience, data analysis, and the expert judgment of NERC and RE staff, committees, and subcommittees.

The 2020 CMEP Risk Elements carry forward some of the inherent risks identified in 2019 and earlier risk assessments. While two of the elements reflect wide area systemic concerns that will be addressed through programmatic mitigation measures - loss of major transmission equipment with extended lead times, and Texas RE: Resource Adequacy - the remaining risks are areas that lend themselves to immediate attention by compliance and reliability staff. These more narrowly focused risks require enhanced coordination of plans that are developed, reviewed, and executed by people.

The human performance theme, while not specifically referenced, is common to all of these more closely defined risks. These are areas that are within the scope of nearly every Registered Entity, and the focus should be increased as a result of the CMEP. For 2020, it’s worth noting that five of the seven risk elements address areas where people’s actions have a direct impact. We should encourage and support these efforts as often and as well as we can

In addition, Loss of Transmission Elements and Resource Adequacy in Texas RE are complex issues with multiple risk vectors and potential solutions. The remaining elements for 2020 are human performance issues, which include staff structure, management, training, and the work environment.

We thought it would be beneficial to summarize the Risk Elements comparison and provide detailed tables showing the changes by the updated Risk Element categories.

Don’t forget – you are responsible for compliance with all Standards and Requirements that apply to your entity, regardless of changes to the risk elements.

Melissa Sease's picture

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Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Feb 13, 2020 5:24 pm GMT

The human performance theme, while not specifically referenced, is common to all of these more closely defined risks. These are areas that are within the scope of nearly every Registered Entity, and the focus should be increased as a result of the CMEP. For 2020, it’s worth noting that five of the seven risk elements address areas where people’s actions have a direct impact. We should encourage and support these efforts as often and as well as we can

What does this reflect-- that the human part is often the weak link in risk management/compliance? 

Melissa Sease's picture
Melissa Sease on Feb 13, 2020 5:57 pm GMT

The passage doesn’t reflect anything in particular, but simply acknowledges the contributions of key personnel and the value of their skills. Assuring they have the tools and support to do their jobs is critical to reliability.

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