This group brings together those who are interested in topics around oil and gas exploration, drilling, refining, and processing.

Charley Rattan's picture
World Hydrogen Leader Charley Rattan Associates

UK based offshore wind & hydrogen corporate advisor and trainer; Faculty member World Hydrogen Leaders. Delivering global hydrogen and offshore wind corporate investment advice, business...

  • Member since 2019
  • 3,451 items added with 2,304,900 views
  • Jan 4, 2022
  • 563 views

Gazproms $11bn project to deliver gas from Russia to Germany seems impossible to abandon and impossible to carry forward

 

Charley Rattan's picture
Thank Charley for the Post!
Energy Central contributors share their experience and insights for the benefit of other Members (like you). Please show them your appreciation by leaving a comment, 'liking' this post, or following this Member.
More posts from this member
Discussions
Spell checking: Press the CTRL or COMMAND key then click on the underlined misspelled word.
Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Jan 4, 2022

Great article Charley, thanks for sharing. I had no idea energy was playing such an important part in Russia's pending invasion of Ukraine.

Nathan Wilson's picture
Nathan Wilson on Jan 8, 2022

The problem is that fossil gas is a much cleaner alternative to German coal, as a way to complement German renewables (see this).  Like it or not, saying "no" to nuclear means saying "yes" to fossil fuel. *

 

I think the best compromise would be to tightly regulate operation of the pipeline terminal.  Don't allow any commercial usage of the gas until the German government has stockpiled at least a 5 year supply (Is gas storage too expensive and dangerous?  That's the price to be paid for clean energy without nuclear power).  And apply a transit tax on the gas that is high enough to be consistent with the Ukrainian alternative. 

 

* Note that this fossil fuel is needed, in spite of Germany's extremely large pumped hydro storage fleet, which is already 6.3 GWatt and growing (source), equivalent to 10% of their average grid demand.  They routinely call up another 3.4 GWatts of pumped hydro plants located in neighboring countries (bringing the total to 15% of average demand).  Germany also has 0.5 GWatts of large scale batteries (as of 2020), but these are typically only an hour of storage, which is only enough for "frequency services" (i.e. easing ramping at coal fired plants).      

 

Get Published - Build a Following

The Energy Central Power Industry Network is based on one core idea - power industry professionals helping each other and advancing the industry by sharing and learning from each other.

If you have an experience or insight to share or have learned something from a conference or seminar, your peers and colleagues on Energy Central want to hear about it. It's also easy to share a link to an article you've liked or an industry resource that you think would be helpful.

                 Learn more about posting on Energy Central »