In partnership with PLMA, this group is for practitioners from energy utilities, solution providers, and trade allies to share load management expertise and explore innovative approaches to program delivery, pricing constructs, and technology adoption.

Peter Key's picture
Freelance Writer, Editor, Consultant Lansdowne, Pa.

I've been a business journalist since 1985 when I received an MBA from Penn State. I covered energy, technology, and venture capital for The Philadelphia Business Journal from 1998 through 2013....

  • Member since 2015
  • 393 items added with 215,955 views
  • Jun 11, 2021 9:16 pm GMT
  • 246 views

Most of this article by the California Energy Commission about a report it issued late last month deals with the fact that California is going to need a heaping helping of electric vehicle chargers by 2030 and that the state is on pace to come up 54,000 chargers short of its goal of 250,000 chargers by 2025.

Near the bottom of the report, however, is another interesting fact. EV charging is going to produce a whole lotta load by 2030 — as much as 5,500 megawatts around midnight and 4,600 MW around 10 a.m. on a typical weekday, which would be an increase of 20 to 25 percent at those times.

To manage that, the commission emphasized the importance of pursuing vehicle-grid integration technology, which enables charger owners to program charging to make it easier at times when renewable generation is high, demand on the grid is low and electricity is cheapest.

Peter Key's picture
Thank Peter for the Post!
Energy Central contributors share their experience and insights for the benefit of other Members (like you). Please show them your appreciation by leaving a comment, 'liking' this post, or following this Member.
More posts from this member
Discussions
Spell checking: Press the CTRL or COMMAND key then click on the underlined misspelled word.
Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Jun 12, 2021

"To manage that, the commission emphasized the importance of pursuing vehicle-grid integration technology, which enables charger owners to program charging to make it easier at times when renewable generation is high, demand on the grid is low and electricity is cheapest."

Peter, as the possibility of late-summer blackouts approaches, anxiety is running high at the California Energy Commission and Public Utilities Commission. They haven't made a priority of grid reliability, and are now attempting to pawn the problem off on electricity customers by raising the price of electricity when it's most convenient to use.

As someone who is about to buy his fourth EV, I write with some experience on this subject: EV owners have no interest in allowing the state to borrow their vehicle's battery capacity to fix its broken grid. It's not just in not knowing they'll have enough juice in their cars to get where they'll need to go: putting their batteries through an extra cycle each day will ultimately decrease their investment's longevity by 50% or more.

California attempts to gloss over this subject as inconsequential, like everybody should want to buy new batteries to help the state clean up its incompetent mess, like it's doing residents a favor. But no - it's one more casualty of the most expensive "free" electricity known to humankind.

Get Published - Build a Following

The Energy Central Power Industry Network is based on one core idea - power industry professionals helping each other and advancing the industry by sharing and learning from each other.

If you have an experience or insight to share or have learned something from a conference or seminar, your peers and colleagues on Energy Central want to hear about it. It's also easy to share a link to an article you've liked or an industry resource that you think would be helpful.

                 Learn more about posting on Energy Central »