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Paul Korzeniowski's picture
B2B Content producer Self-employed

Paul is a seasoned (basically old) freelance B2B content producer. Through the years, he has written more than 10,000 items (blogs, news stories, white papers, case studies, press releases and...

  • Member since 2011
  • 1,398 items added with 471,802 views
  • May 20, 2022
  • 181 views

In 2021, for the second consecutive year, U.S. nuclear electricity generation declined, according to the US Energy Information Administration. Domsetic nuclear power plants’ ouput totaled 778 million megawatthours. 1.5% less than the previous year. Six nuclear generating units with a total capacity of 4,736 megawatts (MW) have retired since the end of 2017. Three more reactors with a combined 3,009 MW of capacity are scheduled to go dark in the coming years. Utilities will need to boost production from other energy sources in order to accommodate the onoing drops.

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Walid Matar's picture
Walid Matar on May 22, 2022

The LCOE (in most cases) of nuclear fission is higher than those of competing technologies/fuels, adding on the costs of decommissioning.

Paul Korzeniowski's picture
Paul Korzeniowski on May 23, 2022

Certainly, many hindrances in trying to keep nuclear a viable energy option, and cost is one such consideration. Regulators want to be careful with the technology -- for good reason -- but it is complex and difficult to manage. 

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