This group brings together the best thinkers on energy and climate. Join us for smart, insightful posts and conversations about where the energy industry is and where it is going.

Post

Economic development depends on both access to energy and the quality of that access

image credit: https://www.bp.com/en/global/corporate/energy-economics/energy-outlook.html
S, Ehsan Marashi's picture
Business Development Manager NEECO

Tehran - Iran

  • Member since 2018
  • 17 items added with 27,520 views
  • Oct 7, 2020
  • 2162 views

There is a strong link between access to energy and economic well-being and prosperity. The importance of energy access is embodied in the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 7 which seeks to “ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all”.

One measure monitored by SDG 7 is global access to electricity, where the number of people without access is estimated to have decreased from 1.2 billion in 2010 to 790 million in 2018.

Economic prosperity and development depend not just on the ability to access electricity, but also on the quantity and quality of the electricity provision.

The World Bank’s multi-tiered framework provides one measure of quality of access, in which Tier 1 access equates to very basic levels of provision (lighting with limited availability) though to Tier 5, which denotes access to plentiful and reliable supplies.

There is a strong link between economic development and the quality of the access to electricity: around three-quarters of low and lower-middle income countries in 2018 had relatively limited access to electricity (Tier 3 or below); whereas over 90% of high-income countries had Tier 5 access.

No alt text provided for this image

Although the share of the world’s population without any access to electricity is estimated to have declined to 10% in 2018, around 45% of the world’s population lived in countries with Tier 3 access or below. In all three scenarios, around a quarter of the world’s population in 2050 live in countries or regions in which average levels of electricity consumption are still equivalent to Tier 3 access or below.

Improving the quality of electricity access – and energy access more generally – across the globe is likely to require a range of different policy approaches and technologies, including the development of decentralized and off-grid power generation.

S, Ehsan Marashi's picture
Thank S, Ehsan for the Post!
Energy Central contributors share their experience and insights for the benefit of other Members (like you). Please show them your appreciation by leaving a comment, 'liking' this post, or following this Member.
More posts from this member
Discussions
Spell checking: Press the CTRL or COMMAND key then click on the underlined misspelled word.
Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Oct 7, 2020

Although the share of the world’s population without any access to electricity is estimated to have declined to 10% in 2018, around 45% of the world’s population lived in countries with Tier 3 access or below

This is such an important point-- getting shoddy access to electricity is better than nothing, but is still a health, safety, and societal risk. This should be the focus of many global initiatives to electrify the world. 

Dr. Amal Khashab's picture
Dr. Amal Khashab on Oct 7, 2020

Yes, but more qualifying access needs more money .  It is a direct relationship.

Get Published - Build a Following

The Energy Central Power Industry Network is based on one core idea - power industry professionals helping each other and advancing the industry by sharing and learning from each other.

If you have an experience or insight to share or have learned something from a conference or seminar, your peers and colleagues on Energy Central want to hear about it. It's also easy to share a link to an article you've liked or an industry resource that you think would be helpful.

                 Learn more about posting on Energy Central »