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Joe Deely's picture
Partner Deely Group

Involved with high-tech for last 30 years. Interested in energy.

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  • Jul 13, 2021
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Great to see UAE's Masdar sharing their renewable expertise with countries around the region. Renewables are booming in developing countries.

Uzbekistan’s Energy Ministry announced on July 12 it has now signed project agreements with Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company (Masdar) for the two 220 MW photovoltaic solar plants in the Jizzakh and Samarkand regions.

According to the newly signed project agreements, Masdar will produce power for the National Electric Grid of Uzbekistan at record low tariffs of 1.791 US cents/kWh for the Samarkand site and at 1.823 US cents/kWh for the Jizzakh site, for a 25-year period.

According to Uzbekistan’s Energy Ministry, Masdar is expected to invest up to $300 million in these projects with a financial close scheduled for December 2021 and construction anticipated to start in the first quarter of 2022.

These projects are part of a wider scheme between the Government of Uzbekistan and the IFC to develop up to 900 MW of solar energy through public-private partnerships.

These plants also contribute to the Government’s plan to develop 8 GW of solar and wind capacity by 2030. Once implemented, they will develop Uzbekistan’s huge solar potential, help reduce annual greenhouse gas emissions by about 500,000 tonnes of CO2 equivalent, and generate an additional 1,100 million kWh of electricity.

In the coming month, the Uzbekistan government is planning to launch a Request for Prequalification for up to 500 MW of PV power plants to be tendered out in three different regions, the Energy Ministrybsaid, adding this third round of IFC tendered solar projects will also include a battery storage component for one of the sites.

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Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Jul 13, 2021

"Renewables are booming in developing countries."

Your attempt to characterize two 220MW solar plants as indicative of a "booming" industry, in a country with 18% capacity factor and a population of 33 million, is amusing at best.

It reminds me of the time Greenpeace showed up in an Indian village with plastic solar panels that would offer each customer a whopping 15 watts of intermittent power. Though Greenpeace offered to install them for free, most villagers declined. Instead, the village bought a diesel generator and built a crude grid so they could have minimal but reliable electricity on demand.

The belief that "15 watts should be good enough for the poor natives" would be cute if it didn't have racist overtones.

Joe Deely's picture
Joe Deely on Jul 13, 2021

Your attempt to characterize two 220MW solar plants as indicative of a "booming" industry, in a country with 18% capacity factor and a population of 33 million, is amusing at best.

I understand Bob... it's sometimes tough to see how one or two small projects fit into a trend. Especially when these projects get built so quickly.

Construction on these projects will start and end in 2022. Then onto the next round...

In the coming month, the Uzbekistan government is planning to launch a Request for Prequalification for up to 500 MW of PV power plants to be tendered out in three different regions,

Before you know it you have 8GW of clean power..

These plants also contribute to the Government’s plan to develop 8 GW of solar and wind capacity by 2030

It must be particularly hard for folks who focus on nuclear where projects take 10 years to complete. Very limited number of projects/countries to keep an eye on. Pretty simple.

Plus a lot of these solar/wind projects in developing countries get very little publicity.

For instance - this other Masdar project in Armenia was also just recently announced.

The project was described by Masdar CEO Mohamed Jameel Al Ramahi as “Armenia’s biggest utility scale solar project,” and by David Papazian, his peer at the Armenian state body, as “by far the largest single foreign investment in green energy in the region, and the second largest foreign direct investment in the history of modern Armenia.”

Thanks for the feedback Bob. I think I'll try to start putting more of these links from other countries up so that folks can see how widespread the boom actually is.

World Adds Record New Renewable Energy Capacity in 2020

Despite COVID-19 pandemic, more than 260GW of renewable energy capacity added globally in 2020, beating previous record by almost 50%

 

 

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Jul 14, 2021

"I understand Bob... it's sometimes tough to see how one or two small projects fit into a trend."

You mean failing to meet expectations? That trend is easy to see - it's so remarkably consistent!

Post what you will, but folks don't really care if the editors at PV Magazine have joyously announced renewables have doubled from nothing to next-to-nothing; that there's a little more intermittent, unpredictable capacity somewhere than there was last year. They know it sells magazines, and there's a sucker born every minute.

Joe Deely's picture
Joe Deely on Jul 14, 2021

That trend is easy to see - it's so remarkably consistent!

I have to admit - you are spot on - it really is remarkably consistent.  

Below is WW generation by fuel chart. You know the source.

I'm gonna with 355 TWh in additional renewables generation for 2021. What about you?

Y-Y growth

  • 2017 - 331 TWh
  • 2018 - 297 TWh
  • 2019 - 338 TWh
  • 2020 - 341 TWh

 

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