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Mary Davis's picture
Analyst Energy Risk Hub

I have more than 12 years experience researching and analyzing all aspects of the global electric power industry. I am passionate about finding the best path foward for a secure and sustainable...

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  • Sep 13, 2021 10:01 pm GMT
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This is great news. Hopefully it will encourage other states and nations to keep nuclear going in the fight against climate change.

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Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Sep 13, 2021

This is great news, Mary. A long, hard fight ends with a big win for Illinois electricity customers and the environment!
 

Nathan Wilson's picture
Nathan Wilson on Sep 15, 2021

Awesome.  Glad to see climate policy that leverages the obvious strategy of closing coal-fired plants and keeping nuclear plants running, while also adding wind and solar.

Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Sep 15, 2021

Agreed, Nathan-- this seems like the right kind of 'all of the above' approach to take, especially where nuclear is already built out. Also notable because lots of different 'sides' or 'camps' of the energy debates like to point to the fact that this energy or that resource needs subsidies to stay viable, but the reality is there are tons of implicit and explicit subsidies all across the board and that shouldn't be treated as an inherent indictment. Instead we should look to shift that support from the damaging (e.g., massive fossil fuel subsidies) to the forward-looking (e.g., ensuring carbon-free generation is supported)

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Sep 15, 2021

I wish Illinois (and California) wind and solar and wind advocates had your balanced perspective on the issue, Nathan, but they don't.

"Members of the Illinois Clean Jobs Coalition want their state to upstage its peers by becoming the first mainland state to be powered entirely by renewables — not just clean energy. Last week, Senator Cristina Castro and Representative Ann Williams introduced legislation that would do just that.

The Clean Energy Jobs Act (SB 2132/HB 3624), backed by 45 mostly Democratic state lawmakers, calls for transitioning Illinois to 100 percent renewable energy by 2050.

The bill specifically states that utility procurement plans “shall” include “cost-effective renewable energy resources” equal to a minimum percentage of each utility's load for all retail customers as follows: 25 percent by June 2025; 45 percent by June 2030; 90 percent by June 2045; increasing to at least 100 percent by June 2050. It also sets an interim target of 100 percent carbon-free electricity in 2030."

Wind and solar interests have revealed they're not in it for the environment - they're in it for the money. They've made themselves the enemy, and I say, "Bring it!". As they did in Illinois, those in California will lose - and it can't happen soon enough.

 

Nathan Wilson's picture
Nathan Wilson on Sep 16, 2021

Wow Bob, that's some really ingenious use of misleading language!

Using enough renewable energy for 100% residential demand, sounds really good until you remember that 62% of US electricity is used by non-residential customers.  Several northern states exceeded 38% clean energy from nuclear & hydro years ago, and several wind-belt states achieved the same low bar recently using windpower.  So they are proposing 30 more years without progress, but adding a rose colored label to their plan.

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Sep 16, 2021

The invisible hand of the American Petroleum Institute and associated shadow organizations is all over that bill, as API works diligently to maintain U.S. dependence on gas by promising renewable dreams that can't possibly come true.

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