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Podcast / Audio

Extreme Climate Change Has Already Arrived

image credit: © Cinnamon Energy Systems - The Energy Show

As I record this radio show the temperature in San Jose is already over 100 degrees. So this week’s show is not just about the future hazards of global warming, but the fact that extreme climate change has already arrived.

I know that a hot day in San Jose is just a reflection of the weather -- not proof of climate change. Weather is what you see outside on any particular day. Climate is the average of the weather over a period of time. When we talk about global warming, we are talking about changes in long term averages of daily weather. So a cold streak in March does not negate the fact that global warming is happening, no more than a hot day in San Jose is definitive proof that the planet is heating up.

Some people have reasons to believe that the earth is really not warming, that this warming is not caused by CO2, or that this CO2 is not caused by humans. Nevertheless, both short term and long term worldwide average temperatures have increased, and 97% of climate scientists believe that this warming is caused by CO2 in the atmosphere.

These temperature changes are not just academic; many locations around the U.S. have already exceeded a 2 degree C temperature rise. The Washington Post analyzed more than a century of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration temperature data in the lower 48 states. They found that more than 1 in 10 Americans -- 34 million people -- are living in rapidly heating regions. 71 counties have already hit the 2 degree C mark. In LA County the average temperature rise was 2.3 C, Silicon Valley was 2 C, NYC was 2.2 C, and my home town in New Jersey was 2 C.

Although a few good things will come from higher temperatures (more farming in Alaska, etc.), the overall impact will drastically affect our society. Sea levels are rising, cities will have to move inland, warmer and more acidic sea water will reduce fishing, hot areas will become uninhabitable, weather will become more severe … the list goes on.

Once we acknowledge this problem, there are only two sensible actions: ADAPT to these global warming changes and MITIGATE the causes of worldwide warming.
Please join us on this week’s Energy Show Podcast for details of the global warming and the extreme climate change we are already experiencing, as well as the actions that we can take.

 

Barry Cinnamon's picture

Thank Barry for the Post!

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Discussions

Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Oct 28, 2019 2:29 pm GMT

Some people have reasons to believe that the earth is really not warming, that this warming is not caused by CO2, or that this CO2 is not caused by humans. Nevertheless, both short term and long term worldwide average temperatures have increased, and 97% of climate scientists believe that this warming is caused by CO2 in the atmosphere.

Agree with you here, but what do you recommend as a strategy for people who dismiss the severity of these effects and point to the occasional cold front or snow storm as 'evidence' that all is right with the world? It seems like until they are struck with a food shortage, damage to their home from sea level rise, or some other 'in your face' effects, it'll all be poppycock to those who actively choose to stick their heads in the sand. 

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