This group brings together the best thinkers on energy and climate. Join us for smart, insightful posts and conversations about where the energy industry is and where it is going.

Len Rosen's picture
Principal Author and Editor 21st Century Tech Blog

Futurist, Writer and Researcher, now retired, former freelance writer for new technology ventures. Former President & CEO of Len Rosen Marketing Inc., a marketing consulting firm focused on...

  • Member since 2018
  • 163 items added with 169,667 views
  • Aug 23, 2021
  • 729 views

The fossil fuel and energy utility companies are seeing in carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) a way to have their cake and eat it too. Is that why these industries are now lobbying governments to subsidize or pay in full for projects to remove CO2 and methane from the atmosphere?

The profit motive for capturing carbon emissions, the pollution that these companies have largely been responsible for, is now a market opportunity said to be worth as much as $800 billion US annually by 2030. Not bad when you can create a global environmental problem and then have others give you money to partake and profit from the solution. And it appears, governments, both national and local, are in an offering mood.

Len Rosen's picture
Thank Len for the Post!
Energy Central contributors share their experience and insights for the benefit of other Members (like you). Please show them your appreciation by leaving a comment, 'liking' this post, or following this Member.
More posts from this member
Discussions
Spell checking: Press the CTRL or COMMAND key then click on the underlined misspelled word.
Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Aug 23, 2021

The fossil fuel and energy utility companies are seeing in carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) a way to have their cake and eat it too.

It also feels a bit like a delay strategy-- they may recognize that the days of fossil fuel on the grid are numbered, but if they can keep the sparkle of promise of CC to allow these plants to be clean in the future, then they can convince more players not to 'prematurely' shut them down. Even if it doesn't come to fruition, it can easily add a decade or two to the energy transition process-- which would come with great profit

Get Published - Build a Following

The Energy Central Power Industry Network is based on one core idea - power industry professionals helping each other and advancing the industry by sharing and learning from each other.

If you have an experience or insight to share or have learned something from a conference or seminar, your peers and colleagues on Energy Central want to hear about it. It's also easy to share a link to an article you've liked or an industry resource that you think would be helpful.

                 Learn more about posting on Energy Central »