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California Power Outages Happening as Predicted When Nuclear Reactors Were Shutdown

Brian Wang's picture
Independent Writer nextbigfuture

Brian Wang is a business-oriented futurist, speaker and author of emerging and disruptive technologies. He is the sole author and writer of nextbigfuture.com, a science-focused news site that...

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In 2018 and many other times, California was warned there would be power interruptions when nuclear reactors were shutdown. California has been having power outages and rolling blackouts because of insufficient power this summer. There was increased demand for electricity for air conditioning as temperatures reached over 100 degrees Fahrenheit and as high as 120F. The shortfall was also due to calm winds which reduced the electricity from wind farms. The shortfall in electrical generation would have been met if the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station had been repaired and restarted for $75 million in 2012. Failing to spend $75

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Joe Deely's picture
Joe Deely on Sep 10, 2020

Shortfall in 2020 was due to a 2 GW plant that last generated in 2011?  Plus the warnings were in 2018? Huh?

What about the 7+ GW of NG capacity that have been retired in CA since 2013 with only about 300 MW of battery capacity added as replacement?

 

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Sep 11, 2020

I've been posting gas transmission limits would cause blackouts in Edison's service since at least 2015, when SCGas tried to stuff too much gas into the Aliso Canyon Gas Reservoir and blew it up. Now renewables advocates are running around like ants on an anthill that's been stepped on - like they're surprised.

First, the California Energy Commission tried to cover the SONGS shutdown with imports, disguised as "Unspecified Sources of Power" - a category invented in 2009 for the express purpose of killing CA nuclear. When imported baseload couldn't do the job alone, CAISO ramped up  increased generation from NG plants (as for wind farms and solar farms, a graph showing "California NG Plant Capacity" is useless).

Unit #2 at SONGS was shut down January 30, 2012, and the graph below shows exactly what it was replaced by. Unlike what the corrupt California Energy Commission told us at the time, none of it was replaced by renewables. 0%. Zilch. Some renewable generation was even replaced temporarily by imported coal and gas, so Edison could keep the lights on after the sun went down!

Joe Deely's picture
Joe Deely on Sep 12, 2020

Bob - having a hard time understanding what you are saying in this comment.

You said:

I've been posting gas transmission limits would cause blackouts in Edison's service since at least 2015, when SCGas tried to stuff too much gas into the Aliso Canyon Gas Reservoir and blew it up. Now renewables advocates are running around like ants on an anthill that's been stepped on - like they're surprised.

Are you saying that the CA blackouts are being caused by NG shortages??

Also, how does SCE fuel mix from 2009-2013 fit in?

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