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Richard Brooks's picture
Co-Founder and Lead Software Engineer, Reliable Energy Analytics LLC

Dick Brooks is the inventor of patent 11,374,961: METHODS FOR VERIFICATION OF SOFTWARE OBJECT AUTHENTICITY AND INTEGRITY and the Software Assurance Guardian™ (SAG ™) Point Man™ (SAG-PM™) software...

  • Member since 2018
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  • Apr 16, 2021
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A few noteworthy tidbits from the OSSRA announcement:

Open source vulnerabilities are on the rise according to the new OSSRA report

Details the pervasive risks posed by unmanaged open source, including security vulnerabilities, outdated or abandoned components, and license compliance issues

The 2021 OSSRA report affirms the fact that open source software provides the foundation for the vast majority of applications across all industries. It also shows that many of those industries are struggling to manage open source risk

All the companies audited in the marketing tech industry sector—which includes lead generation, CRM, and social media—had open source in their codebases. And 95% of those codebases also contained open source vulnerabilities.

  • Ninety-eight percent of healthcare sector codebases contained open source, and 67% of those codebases contained vulnerabilities.
  • Ninety-seven percent of financial services/fintech sector codebases contained open source. Over 60% of those codebases contained vulnerabilities.
  • Ninety-two percent of codebases in the retail and e-commerce sector contained open source, and 71% of the codebases in that sector contained vulnerabilities.

There is widespread use of “abandoned” open source components across all industries. An alarming 91% of the codebases contained open source dependencies that had no development activity in the last two years—meaning no code improvements and no security fixes.

Outdated open source components in commercial software is the norm. Eighty-five percent of the codebases contained open source dependencies that were more than four years out-of-date. Unlike abandoned projects, these outdated open source components have active developer communities that publish updates and security patches. But these patches are not being applied by their downstream commercial consumers.

The prevalence of open source vulnerabilities is trending in the wrong direction. In 2020, the percentage of codebases containing vulnerable open source components rose to 84%—a 9% increase from 2019. Similarly, the percentage of codebases containing high-risk vulnerabilities jumped from 49% to 60%. Several of the top 10 open source vulnerabilities that were found in codebases in 2019 reappeared in the 2020 audits, all with significant percentage increases.

This is why we have a critical need for Software Bill of Materials (SBOM) to help drive software supply chain risk assessments NOW, to provide visibility into these risks BEFORE instllaing a software component in your production systems and devices.

 

 

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