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PJ Davis's picture
Content Manager | Editor | On-Line Event Producer Energy Central

FAVORITE STORY: 'The Mc-Webcast'​ * Power outage, T-Minus 15 minutes to webcast start; laptop in hand, ran down the 11 flights from the office to the car and bolted over to the McDonald's next...

  • Member since 2001
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  • Oct 26, 2021
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What happens when all the electric vehicles start plugging in? Check out Sonoma Clean Power's plan to expand geothermal production. 

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Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Oct 26, 2021

How cool to imagine that your car is being powered literally via the heat of the Earth? Sometimes I forget to pause and realize how futuristic our world already is!

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Bob Meinetz on Oct 26, 2021

"Planning to meet the lofty goals, in June, the California Public Utilities Commission called on suppliers to the California Integrated System Operator-managed grid to bring on line at least 11,500 megawatts of additional net qualifying capacity from zero-emissions sources paired and the battery capacity to store it over the next five years..."

PJ, CPUC's  "lofty goals" would be a joke, if the stakes weren't so big.

In September, together with a budget bill and 14 others, Gov. Gavin Newsom quietly signed into law Senate Bill 423, which permits natural gas - fossil fuel methane - to be considered a "firm zero-carbon resource". 

Natural gas? Zero-carbon? Yes, really. By edict, generating electricity by burning methane, in California, generates no carbon emissions. Only in California.

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