This special interest group is for professionals to connect and discuss all types of carbon-free power alternatives, including nuclear, renewable, tidal and more.

Post

Renewables Set New Records - Provide Almost 30% of US Electricity in April and Over a Quarter During 1st Third of 2022; For the First Time, Wind + Solar Produce More Electricity Than Nuclear Power.

Ken Bossong's picture
Executive Director SUN DAY Campaign

Executive Director of the SUN DAY Campaign since 1992

  • Member since 2003
  • 38 items added with 14,554 views
  • Jul 7, 2022
  • 265 views

Driven by strong solar and wind power growth, electrical generation by renewable energy sources (i.e., also including biomass, geothermal, hydropower) accounted for almost 30 percent of total U.S. electrical generation in April and over a quarter during the first four months of 2022, according to a SUN DAY Campaign analysis of newly-released EIA data. 

 

The latest issue of EIA's "Electric Power Monthly" report (with data through April 30, 2022) also reveals that during the first third of this year, solar (including distributed rooftop systems) expanded by 28.93%, while wind increased by 24.25%. Combined, solar and wind grew by 25.46% and accounted for more than one-sixth (16.67%) of U.S. electrical generation (wind - 12.24%, solar - 4.43%).  

 

Hydropower also increased by 9.99% during the first four months of 2022. However, wind alone provided 70.89% more electricity than did hydropower. 

 

Together with contributions from geothermal and biomass,  the mix of renewable energy sources expanded by 18.49% and provided 25.52% of the nation's electricity during the first four months of 2022. In the month of April alone, renewables accounted for 29.30% of U.S. electrical generation - an all-time high. 

 

For the first third of the year, renewables outpaced coal and nuclear power by 26.13% and 37.80% respectively. In fact, electrical generation by coal declined by 3.94% compared to the same period in 2021 while nuclear dropped by 1.80%.  

 

Moreover, for the first time ever - and probably a harbinger of things to come, the combination of just wind and solar produced more electricity in April than did the nation's nuclear power plants -- 17.96% more.  

 

Notwithstanding headwinds such as the Covid pandemic, grid access problems, and disruptions in global supply chains, solar and wind remain on a roll. Moreover, by surpassing nuclear power by ever greater margins, they illustrate the foolishness of trying to revive the soon-to-retire Diablo Canyon nuclear plant in California and the just-retired Palisades reactor in Michigan rather than focusing on accelerating renewables' growth.

Discussions
Spell checking: Press the CTRL or COMMAND key then click on the underlined misspelled word.

No discussions yet. Start a discussion below.

Get Published - Build a Following

The Energy Central Power Industry Network is based on one core idea - power industry professionals helping each other and advancing the industry by sharing and learning from each other.

If you have an experience or insight to share or have learned something from a conference or seminar, your peers and colleagues on Energy Central want to hear about it. It's also easy to share a link to an article you've liked or an industry resource that you think would be helpful.

                 Learn more about posting on Energy Central »