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World Hydrogen Leader Charley Rattan Associates

UK based offshore wind & hydrogen corporate advisor and trainer; Faculty member World Hydrogen Leaders. Delivering global hydrogen and offshore wind corporate investment advice, business...

  • Member since 2019
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  • Sep 17, 2020
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Floating Wind and Hydrogen.

At first sight, the proposition of the industrial-scale production of hydrogen – with all the challenges inherent in converting air to gas at sea, and all the hazards, difficulties and dangers of working in such a hostile environment – may appear fanciful.

However, there are good reasons why the combination of offshore wind with the production of hydrogen in the sea or at sea may be a very smart idea indeed.

Interested?
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Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Sep 17, 2020

One of the constraints for offshore wind has been the necessity for access to the electrical grid – but the move to hydrogen may remove this – so redefining the very nature of a wind farm. In addition, hydrogen production can utilise existing installations such as reusable gas or oil assets; for example, I am currently advising on the potential of incorporating an electrolyser into an oil and gas platform.

I hadn't thought of this-- offshore wind (particular the more efficient turbines in the deeper waters) definitely struggle with the grid connection problem, both the cost to put in a grid connection and the efficiency loss that comes from that power transportation process. But if hydrogen can instead be transported by pipeline then that flips the script. What'sthe ballpark comparison in how the relative costs and efficiencies of these two different pathways would take? Or are there too many variables and it really comes down to analyzing specific wind turbine sites and seeing which makes sense in that situation?

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