This special interest group is for professionals to connect and discuss all types of carbon-free power alternatives, including nuclear, renewable, tidal and more.

Post

Monster turbines, bifacial modules.... what's next?

Simon Rigling's picture
Business Development Manager Fulcrum3D

Simon is the business development manager for Fulcrum3D, an Australian tech start-up comprised of engineers, scientists and energy sector professionals that manufacture state-of-the-art...

  • Member since 2020
  • 1 items added with 670 views
  • Sep 15, 2020
  • 670 views

The renewable energy industry moves at a rapid pace, especially now that onshore wind and solar are the cheapest source of new-build generation for the majority of the planet.

The innovations being made in both turbine and solar module design are impressive and are being mirrored upstream in the resource assessment space.

With hub heights getting taller, swept areas increasing and bifacial solar panels becoming the norm, resource assessment monitoring technology has also adapted and innovated.

“With hub heights getting taller, swept areas increasing and bifacial solar panels becoming the norm, resource assessment monitoring technology has also adapted and innovated.”

Sodar technology has evolved from originally targeting a measurement height of 150m to 200m in recent years. The technology roadmap is on track to extend high data availability to over 300m in the not too distant future.

Similarly, from a solar perspective, resource monitoring stations are now providing far richer data sets than was the norm in years past.

“Similarly, from a solar perspective, resource monitoring stations are providing far richer data sets than was the norm in years past.”

These now commonly including albedo measurement (reflected solar radiation), for projects contemplating the use of bifacial modules, as well as pyrheliometers (direct beam solar irradiance), module temperature sensors and rain sensors.

Soiling Test Stations and even all sky camera systems which detect, identify, track and predict cloud movement are being rolled out on assessment campaigns in some instances.

High speed data loggers that are designed for fully remote operations are connecting and integrating all these sensors, providing high sampling frequencies of all parameters for statistical aggregation to meet these new demands. 

Data acquisition platforms are aggregating all this data, providing intuitive, user friendly and secure online dashboards to view and download in real time. These platforms can often facilitate multiple sites and monitoring locations to be set up allowing for an overview of the performance of each measurement at each location.

As the industry continues to innovate and evolve, so too does resource assessment technology, helping to minimise project risk and maximise investor value. It begs the question, what's next?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simon Rigling's picture
Thank Simon for the Post!
Energy Central contributors share their experience and insights for the benefit of other Members (like you). Please show them your appreciation by leaving a comment, 'liking' this post, or following this Member.
More posts from this member
Discussions
Spell checking: Press the CTRL or COMMAND key then click on the underlined misspelled word.
Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Sep 15, 2020

Interesting-- so you're suggesting that the greater heights they reach to might not be a challenge but rather an opportunity to collect and use new types of data? If true, that helps flip the script and make the larger installations even more economical!

Julian Jackson's picture
Julian Jackson on Sep 24, 2020

Surely the next step on from vast data acquisition is interpreting it digitally using AI, VR, Machine Learning, etc, to improve productivity and efficiency, not to mention reduce costs of O & M, for example, by using predictive maintenance rather than scheduled. We need to make optimum use of existing assets, I suggest.

Get Published - Build a Following

The Energy Central Power Industry Network is based on one core idea - power industry professionals helping each other and advancing the industry by sharing and learning from each other.

If you have an experience or insight to share or have learned something from a conference or seminar, your peers and colleagues on Energy Central want to hear about it. It's also easy to share a link to an article you've liked or an industry resource that you think would be helpful.

                 Learn more about posting on Energy Central »