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Inside the World’s Largest Operating Nuclear Plant

image credit: Decouple media
Chris Keefer's picture
Senior Editir Decouple Media

ER doc, podcaster, president Canadians for Nuclear Energy.

  • Member since 2022
  • 3 items added with 357 views
  • Sep 13, 2022
  • 357 views

Jesse Freeston’s latest Decouple Studios episode takes us inside the Worlds Largest Operating nuclear plant, Bruce Power, to tell the story of the Just Transition and North America’s greatest greenhouse gas reduction, the #nuclear  powered Ontario #coal phaseout. 
 

 

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Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Sep 13, 2022

Such a great walkthrough, and it's so important to continue to see nuclear power close up. The more that can be done, the more the public will hopefully see it destigmatized and instead appreciate it for what it can bring: dispatchable carbon-free generation. 

Chris Keefer's picture
Chris Keefer on Sep 22, 2022

Thanks for the feedback. Ive toured Bruce 3 times now and its a fascinating piece of Canadian engineering and accomplishment. The Power density is insane and the systems are huge. 50MWe is drawn from the generator to pwoer the pumps and systems of the reactor itself!

Jim Stack's picture
Jim Stack on Sep 19, 2022

So the lake Huron is used to cool the reactors. It heats water. The tons of spent fuel is just sitting there and not 1 ounce has been recycled and made safe. They make 2 tons of deadly waste a day. Not a very nice picture.

    Then Drake and Bieber help stop coal but now create deadly Nuclear waste. Why don't they push for Renewable Energy. Canada has 70% of Niagara Falls and many other Hydro plants. Wind is also great. Solar might be a little weak but still can produce clean power with no water use. They also have great Geo-Thermal in the area. 

    Have 2 of the largest Nuclear plants must make the limited supply of Uranium a scary future. They say they will use the spent nuclear waste for fuel in the future but that has not happened yet. We will see what the real future brings to them.     

Joseph McLeer's picture
Joseph McLeer on Sep 20, 2022

Wow.  This post is an example of why nuclear power has been so stigmatized.  Your facts, except for Canada having 70% of Niagra Falls, are questionable at best.  What does "It heats the water" mean exactly?  There are probably a dozen or so hydro facilities in the vicinty of Niagra Falls.  Hydro power is not generated as you seem to imply by somehow turning turbines placed at the bottom of the falls.  It is by building dams on rivers to create reservoirs to channel flow through turbines.  The Bruce plant does not make 2 tons of deadly nuclear waste a day and, to my knowledge, there has never been any deadly accident involving spent fuel.  You sound like someone who thinks that all the electricity needed for the planet can be produced by renewable sources, which is totally impossible.  Uranium, as all such natural resources, will eventually be gone if they are continued to be used but there is no danger of running out of it for decades.  France has been successfully reprocessing spent fuel for many years.  It was done in the US but was shutdown in the 1980's.  The only reasons it cannot be restarted is because of politics and regulations.

Julian Silk's picture
Julian Silk on Sep 20, 2022

It may be a mistake, but is this really dispatchable? The closest to making an argument for the case of real dispatchable characteristics with the nuclear plants in operation is file:///C:/Users/User/Downloads/USAEE%202018%20abstract_nuclear%20vs%20renewables_Yuan%20et%20al.pdf

It is argued that SMRs are more dispatchable in

https://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/what-are-small-modular-reactors-smrs

but this still seems to demand good forecasting of the actual demand at the time. In other words, if you know demand will fall by 300 MW at 3 A.M., you can program your SMR to have completed ramping down by that time, and you have the other sources running and you just meet demand. But you have to be able to forecast very well for this to be realistic.

Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Sep 20, 2022

Julian-- the first link you included was actually a file location on your computer. Do you have a direct web URL you can share as well? 

Julian Silk's picture
Julian Silk on Sep 23, 2022

Sorry about that, Matt.  Let me see if I can find the right link. 

Julian Silk's picture
Julian Silk on Sep 23, 2022

This link should work: 

I apologize; I am making a lot of mistakes these days.

Julian Silk's picture
Julian Silk on Sep 23, 2022
Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Sep 23, 2022

All good, this works great! Thanks for the resource. 

Chris Keefer's picture
Chris Keefer on Sep 22, 2022

Bruce power has steam bypass and so does a significant amount of load following. 

Todd Carney's picture
Todd Carney on Sep 22, 2022

Wow this was fascinating! I had no idea Canada was so big in nuclear power even. So as you know, nuclear energy is controversial in the US. Do you think as people try to get more energy elsewhere, the political opposition will die down?

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