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DR DEBASIS GUPTA's picture
RETIRED WIND ENERGY PROFESSIONAL, dgdiscourse

I am a retired Sr. Management professional from wind energy space. Devoted 42 years in Wind Turbine and special purpose machine manufacturing industry. Out of which 22 years in Wind Turbine...

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  • Mar 29, 2021
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The effect of global warming will last for generations. Though many corrective actions to control global warming has been initiated worldwide, the temperature rise appears to be worsening steadily. Does it call for a more intensive approach?

Discussions
Rick Engebretson's picture
Rick Engebretson on Mar 31, 2021

Nobody doubts the continued rise in atmospheric CO2 and the growing global demand for cheaper, more versatile energy. We hear too much marketing and politics, and never physics.

For example, the physics of burning fuels to generate electricity, then used to power conventional air-conditioning that blows heated air on your neighbor - who returns even hotter air at you - is absurd. Passive air-conditioning has existed since cave dwellers, and still exists for even insects.

I have had some great discussion with Indian scientists in the US about "light harvesting" fiber-glass roofing, photo-chemical conversion of biomass to fuels and biochar as a huge energy sink, and the "Center for Quantum Molecular Design" at Stanford University.

Good things are happening with actual "Green technology." But there are far too few physicists doing the talking, and far too many politicians digging an ever deeper hole that you describe well.

Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Mar 31, 2021

For example, the physics of burning fuels to generate electricity, then used to power conventional air-conditioning that blows heated air on your neighbor - who returns even hotter air at you - is absurd. Passive air-conditioning has existed since cave dwellers, and still exists for even insects.

This is a really interesting one I haven't heard before! Thanks for the head scratcher, Rick

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Apr 1, 2021

Rick, the heat from your air conditioner that actually warms your neighbor's house is an infinitesimal fraction of that which is dissipated into the atmosphere, and all of that is an infinitesimal fraction of the energy from the sun that strikes the Earth each day.

All energy from the Sun is radiated or reflected out to space except for .58 w/m^2 - the Earth's energy imbalance. Everyone could stop generating CO2 tomorrow - it wouldn't matter, because our CO2 blanket is still absorbing heat.

Unfortunately, the Earth will be at least as warm as it is now for tens of thousands of years. The best we can do going forward is to keep it from accelerating.

https://www.giss.nasa.gov/research/briefs/hansen_16/

Rick Engebretson's picture
Rick Engebretson on Apr 1, 2021

Bob, please look at this recent article:

https://energycentral.com/c/ec/climate-change-may-not-drive-dryland-expa...

It surprised me it is now a given scientific premise that raised atmospheric CO2 essentially creates a raised wildfire hazard. California (and Minnesota) have a lot of learning to do.

DR DEBASIS GUPTA's picture
Thank DR DEBASIS for the Post!
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