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Nuclear Power Policy Activist Independent

I am a passionate advocate for the environment and nuclear energy. With the threat of climate change, I’ve embarked on a mission to help overcome the fears of nuclear energy. I’ve been active in...

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  • Oct 21, 2021
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"California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday signed into law Senate Bill (SB) 423 to accelerate the deployment of “firm zero-carbon resources” for electricity production.

The bill was one of 24 signed Friday alongside a $15 billion spending package focused on climate and clean energy efforts, as well as wildfire and drought resiliency.

SB 423 defines firm zero-carbon resources as 'electrical resources that can individually, or in combination, deliver electricity with high availability for the expected duration of multiday extreme or atypical weather events and facilitate integration of eligible renewable energy resources into the electrical grid and the transition to a zero-carbon electrical grid.'"

If you thought CA Governor Gavin Newsom hadn't yet slipped the bonds of sanity, he now claims burning more fossil fuel will help us burn less of it. Photo: Why are there smokestacks at this zero-carbon California power plant?

 

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Joe Deely's picture
Joe Deely on Oct 21, 2021

As usual Bob - wrong.

 

Here is text of bill - https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220SB423

 

it’s pretty short and easy to read.  No need for NG spokesperson interpretation.

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Oct 21, 2021

Wrong yourself, Joe. Did you read it?
 

"...electrical resources that can individually, or in combination, deliver electricity with high availability for the expected duration of multiday extreme or atypical weather events and facilitate integration of eligible renewable energy resources into the electrical grid and the transition to a zero-carbon electrical grid, referred to as “firm zero-carbon resources.”
 

Because renewables are unreliable, any reliable resource is now considered "firm zero-carbon resource" that's only being used to "facilitate...the transition to a zero-carbon electrical grid" (and not to enrich natural gas interests). Including natural gas. And coal.
 

That's how renewable supporters roll, Joe.  They lie - all the time.

Joe Deely's picture
Joe Deely on Oct 22, 2021

No worries - I'll let the reader decide who is lying here. 

First, let me fix your quoted section - no "..." needed at start unless you don't want reader to see full wording.

(2) “Firm zero-carbon resources” are electrical resources that can individually, or in combination, deliver zero-carbon electricity with high availability for the expected duration of multiday extreme or atypical weather events, including periods of low renewable energy generation, and facilitate integration of eligible renewable energy resources into the electrical grid and the transition to a zero-carbon electrical grid.

Second the below is the main focus of this bill - a report to be submitted in two years. This should have been 2022 as originally proposed but typical government crap.

25216.7.

 (a) On or before December 31, 2023, the commission, in consultation with the Public Utilities Commission, Independent System Operator, and State Air Resources Board, shall submit to the Legislature an assessment of firm zero-carbon resources that support a clean, reliable, and resilient electrical grid in California and will achieve the policy described in Section 454.53 of the Public Utilities Code.

 

(1) Identify all available, commercially feasible and near-commercially feasible firm zero-carbon resources that could support a clean, reliable, and resilient electrical grid, and distinguish which resources are capable of addressing system reliability needs and local reliability needs, with an emphasis on reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases, toxic air contaminants, and criteria air pollutants.

(2) Evaluate the magnitude of potential needs for and role of firm zero-carbon resources using a reasonable range of resource cost and performance assumptions that reflect emerging technology trends in order to help integrate generation from eligible renewable energy resources into the electrical grid on a daily, multiday, and seasonal basis.

(3) Identify barriers to the development of firm zero-carbon resources and possible solutions to address those barriers, including pathways for additional procurement of those resources by load-serving entities, including joint procurements by electrical corporations, community choice aggregators, direct access customers, local publicly owned electric utilities, and other public entities, or a central procurement entity.

(4) Recommend changes to research and development projects, demonstration projects, and energy incentives to support the contributions of firm zero-carbon resources to the near-, mid-, and long-term reliability and resiliency of California’s electrical grid, consistent with California’s goals to reduce localized air pollutants and emissions of greenhouse gases, including early priority in disadvantaged communities.

(5) Evaluate the reliability of load-serving entities’ integrated resource plans under multiday extreme and atypical weather events, which shall include, at minimum, events with extended periods of low renewable energy generation and events that occur in all seasons at least as frequently as once per 10 years.

(6) Evaluate the use of energy storage to achieve the goals pursuant to this section.

 

When the  report ( the action required by this bill) is submitted at the end of 2023 we can can revisit and see who was right.  

In the meantime, I'm investing in geothermal.

Construction underway for Casa Diablo-IV geothermal plant, California

Construction is underway for the binary geothermal power project, Casa Diablo-IV (CD4) located in Mammoth Lakes, CA. Central Coast Community Energy (CCCE) and Silicon Valley Clean Energy (SVCE) will receive 14 MW of the project output through a contract signed with Ormat Technologies.  Construction was officially kicked off in May 2021.

The CD4 project will be the first new geothermal power plant built within the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) balancing authority in the last 30 years. The state recently ordered the procurement of at least 1,000 MW of zero carbon emitting generation resources with at least an 80% capacity factor by 2026 which includes new geothermal. The CD4 project is also using an innovative closed-loop binary process to eliminate the natural carbon emissions associated with flash steam geothermal energy production.

 

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Oct 23, 2021

"First, let me fix your quoted section - no "..." needed at start unless you don't want reader to see full wording.

Sure Joe, quote as much as you like. The meaning, and deception, are the same. So I guess your purpose is...distraction?

"On or before December 31, 2023, the commission, in consultation with the Public Utilities Commission, Independent System Operator, and State Air Resources Board, shall submit to the Legislature an assessment of firm zero-carbon resources..."

You are aware that all commissioners on SECDC, CPUC, all governors at CAISO, and boardmembers at CARB are appointed by our corrupt governor, Gavin Newsom?
Allow me to translate for you:

"On or before December 31, 2023, Faithful Tools of Gavin Newsom, in "consultation" with Multiple Other Such Tools, shall submit to the Legislature a list of "firm zero-carbon resources", possibly including gas and coal as specified in accordance with SB 423, and as ordered by His Royal Highness, Gavin Newsom."

Erika Ginsberg-Klemmt's picture
Erika Ginsberg-Klemmt on Oct 21, 2021

I'm sorry, folks, I'm a newbie here. But I just visited that piece of legislation and the word "natural gas" is not mentioned anywhere in the bill. Bob, could you explain to me why you would say this is a bill proclaiming Natural Gas is a "Zero-Carbon Resource"?

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Oct 21, 2021

Erika, there is a wide open hole in the legislation to enable including any source of generation as a "zero carbon resource" as long as it's "facilitating the transition to a zero carbon grid" (he could say it about coal, too).

By his definition, California has already transitioned to a zero-carbon grid - some of it "firm", and some "not so firm"!
 

Erika Ginsberg-Klemmt's picture
Erika Ginsberg-Klemmt on Oct 22, 2021

Thank you so much for that clarification.  What a move of rhetorical manipulation.
Bob, here is what I find so interesting.  Everyone talks about how we have the technology today to combat climate change, we only need to implement it.  That’s what GismoPower's technology is based on.  As much as everyone loves the idea of GismoPower, it’s less “sexy” than these new, “deep” technologies that require time, money and massive amounts of research.  What can we do to make the technology which is available TODAY implemented TODAY?  Answer: regulatory and policy change!  But HOW?  Anyone? 

 

Bob Meinetz's picture
Bob Meinetz on Oct 23, 2021

Erika, is Toni a relative or is that you? Impressive achievements - Top 25 Entrepreneurs Under the Age of 25, $10,000 Ozy Award!

If GismoPower isn't eligible for the federal investment tax credit (ITC), I think getting one would be the first step. Contact your rep in DC (or better, show up in his/her office with a portfolio of photos & descriptions, and make your best sales pitch.
 

Also, reducing GismoPower's weight and sales price would make it sexier for anyone who appreciates fine engineering. I would use the lightest weight panels you can find, even if it means sacrificing some output - portability means a lot to those who might want it more for a sun shade vs. power generator.

I've seen sun shades that spring into shape by releasing a few latches. If you can find one with a frame that might work for GismoPower you could "borrow" its design, and if it's small and light enough to stow on top, it would be a great accessory for people traveling in RVs.

Gene Nelson's picture
Gene Nelson on Oct 21, 2021

Insanity.

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