This special interest group is for professionals to connect and discuss all types of carbon-free power alternatives, including nuclear, renewable, tidal and more.

Publication

2021 Photovoltaic & BESS Projects

image credit: samsonsolarenergycenter.com
John Benson's picture
Senior Consultant Microgrid Labs

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:Microgrid Labs, Inc.Senior Consultant: 2014 to PresentDeveloped product plans, conceptual and preliminary designs for projects, performed industry surveys and developed...

  • Member since 2013
  • 553 items added with 390,325 views
  • Jun 22, 2021 2:51 pm GMT
  • 375 views

Access Publication

It has been over a year since I posted the last paper similar to this one. This paper looks at large photovoltaic, photovoltaic plus storage and storage projects. This paper is limited to projects in the U.S. that are at least 100 MW and that are either recently completed, under construction or planned to be complete by 2024.

The number of projects that fit the above criteria has grown by 80% in this paper vs. the 2020 paper. There also seems to be quite a bit more geographic diversity for this post, with major projects in 15 states, and many more in the Midwest and Southeast. This paper is also much longer than I prefer (over 5,000 words), but this was necessary to describe relevant details for each project.

Access Publication

John Benson's picture
Thank John for the Post!
Energy Central contributors share their experience and insights for the benefit of other Members (like you). Please show them your appreciation by leaving a comment, 'liking' this post, or following this Member.
More posts from this member
Discussions
Spell checking: Press the CTRL or COMMAND key then click on the underlined misspelled word.
Jim Stack's picture
Jim Stack on Jun 23, 2021

John, Great article. The 80% growth in project the size you wrote on is super progress. Battery Storage has made all of this and more possible. Since the cost is the lowest and speed to have them up and working is short this is the answer.

   Smaller projects are also growing fast. They also provide shade along with the low cost power with no water needed and zero pollution.

    How fast do you think it will keep growing ?

QUOTE =This paper is limited to projects in the U.S. that are at least 100 MW and that are either recently completed, under construction or planned to be complete by 2024.

The number of projects that fit the above criteria has grown by 80% in this paper vs. the 2020 paper. 

 

  

John Benson's picture
John Benson on Jun 23, 2021

Hi Jim: Thanks for the comment and question:

In response to your question, PV is currently the most cost-effective renewable for areas where there is lots of low-cost land. Having lots of clear weather is a also a big plus. Nation-wide PV and wind deployments are running about equal.

In Texas California, Nevada, Arizona, etc., PV + Storage have better economics. In New York, New England, Pennsylvania, etc., off-shore wind is the hot ticket. Where PV is the best fit it is also easier to mitigate its variability using storage.

Although offshore wind has less variability that onshore, it is still more difficult to mitigate the variability with storage than with PV in areas where PV is a good fit.

Specific to your question - the economics of utility-scale PV + Storage will continue to improve, and there is still plenty of land in areas where it is a good fit. Thus in the short-term it will continue to grow. Maybe in three to five years, this growth will start to slow down because of issues with grid dynamics.  I have a post scheduled on this issue (mismatches between generation and load) next Tuesday (29th).

-John

Get Published - Build a Following

The Energy Central Power Industry Network is based on one core idea - power industry professionals helping each other and advancing the industry by sharing and learning from each other.

If you have an experience or insight to share or have learned something from a conference or seminar, your peers and colleagues on Energy Central want to hear about it. It's also easy to share a link to an article you've liked or an industry resource that you think would be helpful.

                 Learn more about posting on Energy Central »