Post

The Impact of Electrification of Transportation

Posted to Smart Grid Reliability Alliance in the Grid Professionals Group
Alan Ross's picture
President Electric Power Reliability Alliance (EPRA)

Experienced Chief Executive Officer with a demonstrated history of working in the think tanks industry. Skilled in Negotiation, Coaching, Sales, Team Building, and Management. Strong business...

  • Member since 2013
  • 42 items added with 35,268 views
  • Jan 10, 2022
  • 223 views

Circumstances cause the need for change, don't they? Covid, both Delta and now Omicron, have had a profound impact on everyone, including our industry. Personally, I have never seen so much change in the utility landscape. Politics and government also cause things to change. Weather events have caused change, and the list of circumstances goes on and on. Most of these circumstances we can look back on and see how it has impacted the organizations we lead, and the way we conduct our businesses.

But what happens if we look ahead, rather than backwards? Can we predict the circumstances that will cause things to change? What does the landscape look like? It seems that the fabric of life itself is changing more than some people can address; all the while still dealing with the circumstances mentioned above. This is not a rhetorical exercise. If we can predict the future,  then we can prepare for the changes ahead. 

Given the electrification of transportation and the predicted growth of vehicles that will run on electricity rather than fossil fuels, what will that do to the grid? I am not proposing answers to that question, but would love to get a conversation started about the impact on the grid, especially the reliability of the smart grid. How do we prepare the smart grid for this projected change?

Henry Ford had a similar dilemma; he had to address the need for a reliable refueling service to make sure his mass produced vehicles could operate. Mass production of automobiles created the need for a network of gas stations, nationwide, along with greater oil extraction and refining. The change he brought created an entire industry that, like it or not, we still rely on to this day, and also an industry that will itself be impacted by the switch to electric vehicles. 

Are we ready as an industry or is it "every man (person, company, agency) for themselves? What do you see or what is your organization doing to address this change to electric vehicles? Let's collaborate and share the information we have.

Smart Grid Reliability Alliance
The Alliance was birthed out of the reliability discipline from the perspective of the IEEE Reliability Society and as a working group within the Society of Maintenance and Reliability Professionals (SMRP).
RECENT POSTS FROM THIS COMPANY
Alan Ross's picture
Thank Alan for the Post!
Energy Central contributors share their experience and insights for the benefit of other Members (like you). Please show them your appreciation by leaving a comment, 'liking' this post, or following this Member.
More posts from this member

Discussions

Spell checking: Press the CTRL or COMMAND key then click on the underlined misspelled word.
Matt Chester's picture
Matt Chester on Jan 10, 2022

Henry Ford had a similar dilemma; he had to address the need for a reliable refueling service to make sure his mass produced vehicles could operate. Mass production of automobiles created the need for a network of gas stations, nationwide, along with greater oil extraction and refining. The change he brought created an entire industry that, like it or not, we still rely on to this day, and also an industry that will itself be impacted by the switch to electric vehicles. 

Further, isn't it true that there were early on versions of vehicles that would run on electricity but the economy of scale would only support one solution or the other (gas vs. electricity)? Given all the early advantages of ICE vehicles, it makes sense they won out-- but I think we may see a similar 'we have to pick one' fork in the road as some instead try to push hydrogen/fuel cell vehicles as additional alternatives rather than going all in on pure battery EV. 

Alan Ross's picture
Alan Ross on Jan 11, 2022

Correct, we could have already been an EV economy instead of an oil economy. Actually maybe the best alternative back then was the Stanley Steamer. All it needed was would and water. And they had plenty of that around.

Jim Stack's picture
Jim Stack on Jan 14, 2022

Alan, The electrification of transportation is a great subject. I am a born optimist. I know it will be good for the GRID  for many reasons.

   1st for 100 years we have had Off Peak power at low cost. The power producers can't ramp up and down coal or nuclear power to match the low off peak needs. Since we encourage electrics to charge at night and many even get lower kWh tou cost  at night that helps make the GRID more efficient. 

   V2G is coming so a Vehicle To GRID flow of power can reduce cost to charge the car and help the GRID. These vehicles can also provide backup power in an outage.

    The same batteries for the cars and being sold to power companies by the Mega Watt. That also makes the GRID more efficient and saves money and reduces pollution. 

    The batteries get lower in cost very quickly similar to mores law for computers and chips. Compare the 1st calculators, home computers and cell phones. You get more for less. A real technology advance. Electric cars are improving that fast. 

   

Get Published - Build a Following

The Energy Central Power Industry Network is based on one core idea - power industry professionals helping each other and advancing the industry by sharing and learning from each other.

If you have an experience or insight to share or have learned something from a conference or seminar, your peers and colleagues on Energy Central want to hear about it. It's also easy to share a link to an article you've liked or an industry resource that you think would be helpful.

                 Learn more about posting on Energy Central »